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I am trying to convert time_t to in64_t by doing the following.

time_t t = 1349388030;

I have an API.

SomeObj.setValue(const int64_t)            // Sets the value of SomeObj to the passed argument
SomeObj.getValue(int64_t & value) const    // Returns the value

I then execute the following.

SomeObj.setValue(t)
int64_t tt;
SomeObj.getValue(tt)
assert (tt == t)                           // Fails where tt = 109726776

Can anyone please help with the proper casting procedure?

EDIT:

it was bug in my code the way I was using set_value

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What's the code for setValue and getValue? –  Mark Ransom Oct 4 '12 at 22:21
    
I just pass in refernce to tt which gets update in getValue. setValue is an api I have that I dont have access to. But I am sure its doing the the right thing. I think its my casting which is broken. –  gaurav jain Oct 4 '12 at 22:23
    
By "what's the code", @Mark is asking you to update your question to include the actual code. –  Nemo Oct 4 '12 at 22:27
    
It's hard to help if you say I think its my casting which is broken but you don't show the casting code. –  amdn Oct 4 '12 at 22:29
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@PuraVida I think they mean the implicit cast when passing t as an argument to setValue(const int64_t). But that's not the problem. –  Joseph Mansfield Oct 4 '12 at 22:32
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There are 3 cases where you have to worry about casting from one integer type to another:

  1. You cast from a large integer to a small one. I'm reasonably confident that sizeof(int64_t) >= sizeof(time_t) so that shouldn't be a problem.
  2. You cast an unsigned type to a signed type, and value is outside the range of the signed type. Again unlikely since 1349388030 is less than 2^31.
  3. You cast a signed type to an unsigned type, and the value is negative. Doesn't apply here.

I don't think the problem is in your casting.

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I'll just add that there is, annoyingly, no truly platform-independent type that can take all values of time_t (except, of course, time_t). You might think uintmax_t should take care of that, and it would if time_t was guaranteed to be an integer type. But it's not. It's an arithmetic type, which means it could even be a float or double. –  Joseph Mansfield Oct 4 '12 at 23:05
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I'm assuming from what you've said that SomeObj doesn't really care what the time is, it's just some storage container that you need to store times in. I'm also assuming that in your use case, whatever format you store your time in doesn't need to be portable, and the stored times will always be used on the same system in which they're generated . If either of these assumptions is not true, then casting is not an appropriate solution for your problem (and I discuss a more appropriate solution below, ref discussion about localtime()).

To store a time_t value inside an int64_t variable, of course sizeof(time_t) must be less than or equal to sizeof(int64_t), so your code needs to have an assertion check for that. Now you can't just assign a time_t to a int64_t (which would work just fine on most but not all systems), because if time_t is a floating-point type, you'll likely lose precision in the conversion, and when it's converted back to a time_t it might not be the same value (though it may be "close to" the correct value). The point is, for portable code, you can't make any assumptions about the format of a time_t value. Let me reiterate here, even though the code below is portable, the solution does not generate time values that are themselves portable; i.e., if you generate a time_t value on one system and your SomeObj transmits that value to another "system" (even on the same processor but compiled by a different compiler) for interpretation on the other system, the other system may or may not interpret the value the same way. For that, you'll need to convert the time_t into discrete numbers, perhaps via localtime() or localtime_r(), transfer that structure to the other system, and convert it to that system's time_t format via mktime().

In any case, to stuff a time_t value into a uint64_t in an interpretation-agnostic way, you'll want to read the bits from the time_t value's location as a uint64_t. If time_t is not as wide as uint64_t, you'll read in extra bits, but that doesn't matter; those bits are "don't care" bits. Then to read the time_t value back out of that uint64_t, you'll want to read the bits from the uint64_t's location as a time_t. In other words, you take the address of the source variable, cast it as a pointer of the destination type, and then dereference it. If the sizes of the types don't match, you'll either read extra garbage bits into the destination variable or else you'll lose bits which presumably were garbage bits anyway. Here's how you do it in code...

#include <time.h>
#include <assert.h>

struct SomeClass
{
    int64_t i64;
    void setValue(const int64_t v) { i64 = v; }
    void getValue(int64_t& v) const { v = i64; }
};

#if 0 // Set to 1 for C style casting, or 0 for C++ style casting.

    int main()
    {
        assert (sizeof(int64_t) >= sizeof(time_t));
        // ...fundamental, otherwise nothing else has any hope of working

        SomeClass SomeObj;

        time_t t = 1349388030;
        int64_t i = *((int64_t*)&t);
        SomeObj.setValue(i);

        int64_t ii;
        time_t tt;
        SomeObj.getValue(ii);
        tt = *((time_t*)&ii);

        assert (tt == t);
    }

#else

    int main()
    {
        assert (sizeof(int64_t) >= sizeof(time_t));
        // ...fundamental, otherwise nothing else has any hope of working

        SomeClass SomeObj;

        time_t t = 1349388030;
        int64_t i = *reinterpret_cast<int64_t*>(&t);
        SomeObj.setValue(i);

        int64_t ii;
        time_t tt;
        SomeObj.getValue(ii);
        tt = *reinterpret_cast<time_t*>(&ii);

        assert (tt == t);
    }

#endif
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I don't see a problem with your code. On some platforms time_t is already int64_t. I think your problem is elsewhere. What's inside SomeObj?

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