Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Say I've got someting I use a lot. For instance about 90% of the time when I use

explode ($delimiter, $string);

Usually you'd be using it like this:

$string = "blah/blah/blah";
$e = explode("/", $string);

Will PHP be faster if I write a custom function?

#reusable 
function c4($str) {
    return explode("/", $str); 
} 
$e = c4("blah/blah/blah/");

Or maybe when written as a Anonymous function?

#reusable
$c4 = function($str) {
    return explode("/", $str);
};
$e = $c4("blah/blah/blah");

I don't know how to put this, but maybe this is the right question: Does PHP 'cache' user functions for future use (while parsing)? If so, what is the breakpoint of using native functions and reusing the same custom function becomes more efficient when the same parameters are used. Possibly because of the less amount of parseable code?

Just read StackOverflow's suggestion:

"We prefer questions that can be answered, not just discussed."

So I really hope this doesn't end in discussion. Very curiously awaiting your reply!

share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by Alix Axel, Jocelyn, ЯegDwight, tereško, martin clayton Oct 5 '12 at 0:40

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
why don't you put 10000 explodes vs 10000 custom functions into a test PHP file and measure the time taken? in my view, a function within a function will be always slower, especially when explode() is a built-in function –  Zathrus Writer Oct 4 '12 at 22:23
2  
A compiler for a compiled language might inline the function call for optimization purposes (PHP definitely doesn't do that). But even if that were to happen, then the code would run just as fast, not faster. –  rid Oct 4 '12 at 22:25
    
Jeez, almost all answers where here in an instance. As I'm fair, you'd all should get 1^. Thanks for this insight. –  Peter Versnee Oct 4 '12 at 22:33

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think you should see for your self , you would use x2 of normal system resources

$string = "blah/blah/blah";
$max = 1000;

echo "<pre>";
$start = microtime(true);
for($i = 0; $i < $max; $i ++) {
    $e = explode("/", $string);
}
echo microtime(true) - $start, PHP_EOL;


$start = microtime(true);
function c4($str) {
    return explode("/", $str);
}
for($i = 0; $i < $max; $i ++) {
    $e = c4("/", $string);
}
echo microtime(true) - $start, PHP_EOL;


$start = microtime(true);
$c4 = function ($str) {
    return explode("/", $str);
};
for($i = 0; $i < $max; $i ++) {
    $c4($string);
}
echo microtime(true) - $start, PHP_EOL;

Output

0.019805192947388
0.040219068527222
0.040642023086548
share|improve this answer
    
codepad.org/hRXUR4Z2 not exactly faithful. –  Alix Axel Oct 4 '12 at 22:27
    
Depends on php version see codepad.viper-7.com/EZVxZr and codepad.viper-7.com/1PdGPb @Alix Axel –  Baba Oct 4 '12 at 22:30
    
Haha, no. Reload codepad.viper-7.com/1PdGPb a couple of times and you'll see the lambda call taking 0.00075793266296387 while the direct call takes 0.0023701190948486. You can't benchmark this kind of stuff this way, at least with so few iterations as the results will be completely inconsistent and unreliable. –  Alix Axel Oct 4 '12 at 22:35
1  
Answer is so f*cking stupid. And now I am too :). Could've thought of this test myself. –  Peter Versnee Oct 4 '12 at 22:37
1  
@Baba: This should be more consistent tho: codepad.viper-7.com/zeh7VV. –  Alix Axel Oct 4 '12 at 22:44

I know this isn't exactly what you asked, but here are some other things to think about as well.

  1. Will it allow you and your team to code more quickly or more slowly?

  2. Will it improve or decrease the readability of your code when you need to go back and make a change two years from now. Or when the next programmer inherits it?

  3. Does it help you stick to the DRY principle?

I would say in this specific instance, you're better off using explode or split. People already know what it means so the code is readable. Two years from now you will not remember what c4 is (although if you named your function something like split_on_slashes that would probably improve your code).

Given that your function is essentially replicating one line of code, I don't see it as really helping stay DRY. Essentially you're saving the hassle of typing "/",

However, if you had even a small two or three line section of code you were repeating often, this approach would likely speed up your coding, reduce chances of error, and help you stay DRY.

share|improve this answer
    
Good pointing this out to me. Obviously I wasn't gonna call it "c4()" but for this exemplary case I cose this. Nice one on the last paragraph, I'll keep that one in mind. –  Peter Versnee Oct 4 '12 at 22:35

Regardless the 'caching' now two functions have to be executed. So it definitely adds something.

share|improve this answer

No. PHP will not execute your wrapped version faster than it will a direct call to a built-in function. It will always be an extra function call.

share|improve this answer

No, it will never be faster because in the end you'll be relying on the same built-in function.

Actually, it will consume a bit more time to preprocess the file, a bit more memory and a bit more CPU time per each call, not to mention the clutter you'll have if you name your common functions c4.

share|improve this answer

No, it will be slower, because now it needs to make a function call too.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.