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When writing a helper method for a class in C++, should it be declared as a private method in the class's definition in the header (.h) file? For example:

/*Foo.h*/
class Foo {

     public:
         int bar();

     private:
         int helper();
};
...
/*Foo.cpp*/
...
int foo::bar() {
    int something = this->helper();
}

int foo::helper() {
    ...
}

Or alternatively, is it better not to declare it as a private member of the class, and instead just make it a free-standing function in the implementation?

/*Foo.h*/
class Foo {
    public:
        int bar();
};
...
/*Foo.cpp*/
...
int Foo::bar() {
    int something = helper();
    ...
}

int helper() {
    ...   
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

A freestanding function in the implementation file improves encapsulation: it needs no declaration in the header, so no recompilation of client code when its signature changes for whatever reason. For me, that's a good enough reason to prefer this option whenever it's feasible. (Be sure to put it in the anonymous namespace to prevent identifier clashes at link time.)

However, a private method has access to a class instance and its private parts via the this pointer. If it needs such access, then it must either be a method or a friend. In both cases, it'll be visible in the class definition (header file), and methods are simply more convenient than friends.

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1  
To expand on your second paragraph: prefer non-friend non-member functions. If a function doesn't need private access, don't give it private access. –  Joseph Mansfield Oct 4 '12 at 23:13
    
@sftrabbit: thanks. I sharpened the second paragraph a bit. –  larsmans Oct 4 '12 at 23:38

If your helper function makes sense to be a method of the object, I would almost always prefer to make it a member function so there is an implicit this pointer, rather than pass a Foo * to the helper function.

If the helper function doesn't need to be a method of the object (that is, it doesn't need access to data members or other member functions), then make it a standalone function (static or in an anonymous namespace, preferably).

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This is a little subjective, I think.

In my view, it depends whether it has anything to do with the class's members and/or whether you expect friend classes to use it (or derived classes in the case of protected access).

If the function doesn't actually operate on any members, and nobody else is interested in it, you should keep it in the implementation file as a static function. In addition, if it's an operation that must be fast you can take that opportunity to make it inline.

Conversely, if the function operates on the class or may have extra uses in derived or related classes, make it a member.

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My position is that the header contains as little ad possible while achieving the desired design and layout properties. If there is an option it goes into the source. Some internal details need access to too many internal details of a class to make it viable to ho into the implementation, though.

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