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Sorry I had the wrong code before...

So I have an interface that looks like:

public interface Player { 
    void setPartner(Player partner); 
}

And I have an implementation of that interface that looks something like this:

public class Human implements Player
{
    private Human partner;

    public void setPartner(Human partner)
    {
        this.partner = partner;
    }
}

So the compiler says that I am not implementing every method from Player which indicates to me that I have to match the parameter type of the setPartner method exactly, even though the a Human, is a Player. Is there any good way of getting around this or implementing this differently?

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I don't get an error with your code. –  Ted Hopp Oct 4 '12 at 23:11
3  
What version of Java are you using? IIRC, newer versions will support what you are trying to do here by detecting that a Human is indeed a Player. However, older versions will not have this feature. –  Code-Apprentice Oct 4 '12 at 23:12
3  
Method covariance starts with Java 5. –  Frank Pavageau Oct 4 '12 at 23:20
2  
@Code-Guru - Nice insight. Covariant return types were introduced in Java 1.5 (a.k.a. Java 5). –  Ted Hopp Oct 4 '12 at 23:21
1  
@Code-Guru Return types and declared exceptions can be covariant, right. –  Frank Pavageau Oct 5 '12 at 5:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You cannot have covariant parameters (what happens if you manipulate your Human instance through the Player interface?), however you can use generics.

public interface Player<T extends Player<T>> {
    void setPartner(T partner);
}

public class Human implements Player<Human> {
    private Human partner;

    public void setPartner(Human partner) {
        this.partner = partner;
    }
}

However, you can't force the implementing class to actually use its own type as the type parameter of Player.

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Why would manipulating a Human through the Player interface be cause for concern? –  meriton Oct 4 '12 at 23:34
    
Thanks this is exactly what I needed :) –  user1721559 Oct 4 '12 at 23:38
    
@meriton In the OP's code? human.setPartner(robot) where human is a Player variable referencing a Human instance, and robot another Player variable referencing a Robot instance, which also implements Player, is legal since Player.setPartner() takes any Player. However, Human.setPartner() would only take another Human. –  Frank Pavageau Oct 4 '12 at 23:38
    
So the one problem that I see with this is that there is no way to force the class that is implementing Player to use it's own class as the type for T. Is there perhaps a way to get around this? –  user1721559 Oct 4 '12 at 23:49
    
@user1721559 No, you can't force it. –  Frank Pavageau Oct 5 '12 at 5:09

In Java, method parameter is invariant. That means void setPartner(Player partner) method signature is different than void setPartner(Human partner) method signature even though Human is-a Player. So you cannot implement (or override) like that.

Care must be taken while extending a class becuase if Player was a class and the method was not abstract than it would actually work but you would have overloaded the method instead of overriding it.

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This makes sense as setPartner(Human) is more restrictive than setPartner(Player). By implementing Player, you're saying that setParner accepts any Player. Your setPartner(Human) method only accepts the subclass Human and not other Player implementations.

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