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I've got a Tab class which has a list of Components.

list<Component*> Tab::getComponents() {
    return (this->components);
}

void Tab::addComponent(Component* comp){
    this->components.push_front(comp);
}

Tab::Tab() {
    // x = 25, y = 30
Button* one = new Button(25,30,300,100, "images/button.png");
this->addComponent(one);

Button* two = new Button(75,100,300,100, "images/button.png");
this->addComponent(two);

    // x = 150, y = 150
Button* three = new Button(150,150,300,100, "images/button.png");
this->addComponent(three);  
}

Now for the problematic code:

list<Component*>::iterator it = activeTab->getComponents().begin(); 
for (it ; it != activeTab->getComponents().end(); it++) {
    offset.x = (*it)->getX();
    cout << "offset.x = " << offset.x << endl;
    offset.y = (*it)->getY();
    cout << "offset.y = " << offset.y << endl;
}

This is the output of the first iteration of the for loop:

offset.x = 25
offset.y = 30

But, seeing that I used push_front(), it should be:

offset.x = 150
offset.y = 150

What am I doing wrong?

EDIT: the second iteration of the for loop prints garbage...

offset.x = 16272
offset.y = 17

And the third just prints segmentation fault :(

share|improve this question
1  
The code you've given doesn't print anything out. Can you post a full example that prints out offset.x and offset.y? I'm guessing your problem is in that piece of the code, since what you've posted looks reasonable. – Soverman Oct 4 '12 at 23:32
    
I see an extra ) in the first line of for loop. – Recker Oct 4 '12 at 23:37
    
@abhinole, that was a typo :P – mparnisari Oct 4 '12 at 23:39
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your Tab::getComponents() returns list<Component*> instead of list<Component*>&, which means, this->components is copied when returning. Thus, let's look at the code:

list<Component*>::iterator it = activeTab->getComponents().begin(); 
// ``it'' is already INVALID here since the list returned in the above line
// is already destructed!
for (it ; it != activeTab->getComponents().end(); it++) {
    offset.x = (*it)->getX(); //``it'' is invalid
    cout << "offset.x = " << offset.x << endl;
    offset.y = (*it)->getY();
    cout << "offset.y = " << offset.y << endl;
}

The iterator it is invalid when you dereference it.

share|improve this answer

Notice that your method getComponents() is returning a copy, you should return a reference.

list<Component*>& Tab::getComponents() {
    return (this->components);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Oh, good catch, that's the bug. In fact I'm surprised the loop terminates at all. – Soverman Oct 4 '12 at 23:47
    
Thanks a bazillion! =) – mparnisari Oct 4 '12 at 23:50
    
@Soverman It doesn't, it segfaults. But this certainly explains the segfault. – CrazyCasta Oct 5 '12 at 0:54

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