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I am new to Java, and the whole working with arrays + using classes and their methods to populate and display the arrays. I have spent the last 2-3 hours, working on this and checking google for various answers and none have seemed to help, I am still stuck. I don't really know how to use the methods from the rectangle1 class, when using arrays.

Main class:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    GameBoard frame = new GameBoard();
}

GameBoard Class

public class GameBoard extends JFrame {

    public GameBoard() {

        JFrame frame = new JFrame();
        frame.setBounds(0, 0, 195, 215);
        frame.setVisible(true);
        frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);

        Rectangle1 board[][] = new Rectangle1[3][3];
        for (int row = 0; row < board.length; row++) {
            for (int col = 0; col < board[row].length; col++) {
                board[row][col] = new Rectangle1(0, 0, 195, 215);
                if ((row + col) % 2 == 0) {
                    Graphics g = null;    
                    board[row][col].paint(g);
                    g.setColor(Color.yellow);
                    g.fillRect(0, 0, 195, 215);
                } else {
                    Graphics h = null;
                    board[row][col].paint(h);
                    h.setColor(Color.red);
                    h.fillRect(0, 0, 195, 215);
                }
                frame.add(board[row][col]);
            }    
        }  

    }
}

Rectangle1 class.

public class Rectangle1 extends JComponent  {

    /** post:   getX() == x  and  getY() == y
     *          and  getWidth() == w  and getHeight() == h
     *          and  getBackground() == Color.black
     */
    public Rectangle1(int x, int y, int w, int h)  {
        super();
        setBounds(x, y, w, h);
        setBackground(Color.black);
    }

    /** post:   this method draws a filled Rectangle
     *          and  the upper left corner is (getX(), getY()) 
     *          and  the rectangle's dimensions are getWidth() and getHeight()
     *          and  the rectangle's color is getBackground()
     */
    public void paint(Graphics g)  {
        g.setColor( getBackground() );
        g.fillRect(0, 0, getWidth()-1, getHeight()-1);
        paintChildren(g);
   }

}
share|improve this question
1  
What is your question? –  Code-Apprentice Oct 5 '12 at 1:55

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Firstly, you are fighting the layout manager, calling something like setBounds(x, y, w, h) in you Rectangle class is going to overridden by the layout manager of the parent container (the frame in this case)

Secondly, you are not responsible for painting, do this;

board[row][col].paint(g);
g.setColor(Color.yellow);
g.fillRect(0, 0, 195, 215);

...is wrong. If it doesn't end up with you programming crashing, then your lucky.

While I try and figure out a solution, you might like to take some time and read through

While on my rant...

This; public void paint(Graphics g) { g.setColor( getBackground() ); g.fillRect(0, 0, getWidth()-1, getHeight()-1); paintChildren(g); }

is inappropriate. You MUST call super.paint(), there's to much going on in the background for you to override this method without calling it's super.

In fact, you should avoid overriding paint where ever possible and user paintComponent instead.

Also, coordinates in Swing are relative to the component. That is, the top/left corner of any component (within the context of the component) is always 0x0

Here's a working example

public class TestBoard {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new TestBoard();
    }

    public TestBoard() {

        EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {

                new GameBoard();

            }
        });

    }

    public class GameBoard extends JFrame {

        public GameBoard() {

            JFrame frame = new JFrame();
            frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
            frame.setLayout(new GridBagLayout());
            GridBagConstraints gbc = new GridBagConstraints();
            gbc.gridx = 0;
            gbc.gridy = 0;

            Rectangle1 board[][] = new Rectangle1[3][3];
            for (int row = 0; row < board.length; row++) {

                gbc.gridx = 0;

                for (int col = 0; col < board[row].length; col++) {
                    board[row][col] = new Rectangle1(195, 215);
                    if ((row + col) % 2 == 0) {
                        board[row][col].setBackground(Color.YELLOW);
                    } else {
                        board[row][col].setBackground(Color.RED);
                    }
                    frame.add(board[row][col], gbc);
                    gbc.gridx++;
                }

                gbc.gridy++;

            }

            frame.pack();
            frame.setVisible(true);

        }
    }

    public class Rectangle1 extends JPanel {

        public Rectangle1(int w, int h) {
            setPreferredSize(new Dimension(w, h));
        }

    }
}

Because of the nature of your requirements, I've been forced to use GridBagLayout which is not the simplest of layout managers to use.

JComponents are transparent by nature and you are required to fill them, better to use JPanel

share|improve this answer
    
Ok thank you. :) –  user1719605 Oct 5 '12 at 2:00

Comments:

  1. GameBoard extends JFrame but then you create a JFrame instance in the GameBoard constructor. You should do one or the other, but not both.

  2. Rectangle.paint() should probably be Rectangle.paintComponent(). Now you just have to create Rectangle objects and add them to a container, such as a JFrame or a JPanel. They will be painted automatically. You don't have to call paint() or paintComponent() explicitly if you are extending JComponent.

share|improve this answer
    
For point 1. Just use an instance of a frame, unless adding new behavior (very rare). –  Andrew Thompson Oct 5 '12 at 2:03
    
@AndrewThompson I tend to extend JFrame and add components in the constructor. Of course, that is usually only a single custom JPanel which then adds components in its constructor. –  Code-Apprentice Oct 5 '12 at 2:17

You are using the null Graphics object to paint your window. Instead of using

Graphics g = null; Graphics h = null;

Use

Graphics g = getGraphics(); Graphics h = getGraphics();

Most probably this would have given you a NullPointerException isn't it?

And more over since your rectangles are inheriting from the JComponent, you should not call paint() method yourself. Instead call repaint() once all of them are added to the frame.

share|improve this answer
    
I was getting that before. I made those changes and still get: Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NullPointerException at tictactoe.Rectangle1.paint(Rectangle1.java:28) at tictactoe.GameBoard.<init>(GameBoard.java:32) at tictactoe.TicTacToe.main(TicTacToe.java:22) –  user1719605 Oct 5 '12 at 1:54
    
Instead of calling the paint() method, call repaint() –  Sri Harsha Chilakapati Oct 5 '12 at 1:57

Here is your problem:

Graphics g = null;
board[row][col].paint(g);

You calling paint() with a null Graphics which causes a NullPointerException

public void paint(Graphics g)  {
        g.setColor( getBackground() );
        g.fillRect(0, 0, getWidth()-1, getHeight()-1);
        paintChildren(g);
}
share|improve this answer
    
For clarification, this is one of several issues. –  Code-Apprentice Oct 5 '12 at 2:00

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