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Edit: Here's a package with ready made HTML and XML documents for testing: http://d.pr/f/k5eA

Seriously, what the flip is wrong with IE? It throws an "Object doesn't support this property or method" error when i'm accessing XML data loaded via AJAX. I've spent the whole night trying to find the cause, but with no success.

Nothing wrong with the code, nothing wrong with the XML data, works fine every other browser, in fact it even works in IE9, but only when it's running local, as soon as it's in the internet zone it starts throwing errors. One could think that it's the zone security settings, but it doesn't even work with lowest security settings.

The debugger shows that the XML data was loaded and parsed sucessfully, it shows that data is of type IXMLDOMDocument2, where as locally it says it's of type Document, having a look at the jQuery source shows that it's probably using Microsoft.XMLHTTP locally, and otherwise XMLHttpRequest if available, so that might have something to do with it.

I can workaround this problem by loading the data as text, and using $.parseXML afterwards, but i'd really like to know what's going on here, is this a known bug, or am i missing something else?

Example (using jQuery 1.8.2):

<?xml version='1.0' encoding='utf-8'?>
<root>
    <child>child</child>
</root>

$.ajax({
    url: 'test.xml',
    dataType: 'xml',
    success: function(data)
    {
        alert(data);
    }
});
share|improve this question
    
Could you provide some of the real code giving the problem? It is particularly hard to guess what is going on with this code –  Mamsaac Oct 5 '12 at 2:03
    
That is not the real code in the project, but it's the real code that causes the problem, i can pack a zip with ready made HTML and XML file, but there would be no additional code. –  ndm Oct 5 '12 at 2:09
    
I know that's not the real code. But see, in order to have an idea of what is happening, I believe it is necessary to have more information. It is not very likely this is a bug from jQuery since it is a very common functionality (although I don't discard it). Chances are something is being done wrong on the returned XML data –  Mamsaac Oct 5 '12 at 2:12
    
Normally i'd say that's right, but i've isolated the problem, so there's no need for the rest of the code. What i've posted there is all it needs to reproduce the problem, so it's definitly not a problem in my other code. I've updated the question with a ZIP package containing ready made HTML and XML documents. –  ndm Oct 5 '12 at 2:21

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you want to see 'data' as a string that can be alerted, do this:

$.ajax({
    url: 'test.xml',
    dataType: 'text',
    success: function(data)
    {
        alert(data);
    }
});

If there is something else you are doing with the XML, we need to see what you are trying to do.

Based on what you posted (I downloaded it), this works in IE:

$.ajax({
    url: 'test.xml',
    dataType: 'xml',
    success: function (data) {
        alert(jQuery(data).find('child').text());
    }
});
share|improve this answer
    
I know i can do that, that's what i've ment in the last sentence ;) The code i've posted is all it takes to trigger the problem, ofcourse there's more in my actual project, but it's not neccessary for reproducing the problem. –  ndm Oct 5 '12 at 2:11
    
That's what I'm saying, you can't alert data and expect it to work when it comes back as an Xml object. post how you want to use it to reveal the problem. –  Lawrence Johnson Oct 5 '12 at 2:18
    
I thought i could. Shouldn't every object have an toString method that is being called internally when the object is requested to be represented as text? –  ndm Oct 5 '12 at 2:41
    
It would be nice, and it may be the case. There might be an actual problem, but until we can see what it's doing in its intended use, we might be looking for the answer to a problem that doesn't exist. –  Lawrence Johnson Oct 5 '12 at 2:43
1  
That's like trying to ask the meaning of life. Why the programmers made it this way is not really relevant since you would never do what you're trying to do. Unlike languages like C# where every class is derived from Object (which has its own .ToString()), not all objects follow that model. The real problem was in your Javascript of how you were trying to use it, which is why we asked from the get go. For speculation's sake, Microsoft has a tendency to repurpose a lot of systems that are sometimes not that friendly with newer systems. –  Lawrence Johnson Oct 5 '12 at 3:02

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