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Is there a way to have a query return either a 'Y' or 'N' for a column if that column has a value above a certain number say '25'.

I am using DB2 on ZOS

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You need to specify which version / implementation of SQL you are using (Oracle / SQL Server / MySQL etc.) –  Dave Glassborow Aug 13 '09 at 18:47
    
Sorry...It was DB2 zos –  Tony Borf Aug 13 '09 at 19:41
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8 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted
SELECT CASE WHEN Col1 > 25 THEN 'Y' ELSE 'N' END As Value1
FROM Table1
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For MySQL:

SELECT IF(column > 25, 'Y', 'N')
  FROM table

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/control-flow-functions.html#function%5Fif

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Use the SQL CASE statement

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SELECT CASE WHERE columnname > 25 THEN 'Y' ELSE 'N' END FROM table;
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select 
case when somecolumn > 25 then 'Y' else 'N' end as somename
from sometable;
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Select If(myColumn > 25, 'Y', 'N') From myTable

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Apart from the IF and CASE statements another valid alternative is to create a user defined function feeding in your column value and returning Y or N.

This has the not inconsiderable advantage that if you are selecting on this criteria in more than on SQL statement and at a later date your condition changes - to over 30 say - then you have only one place to change your code. Although using a function adds complexity and overhead so is not always optimal don't underestimate the maintenance advantage of this approach. A minor plus too is you can make the name of the function something more meaningful, and hence self documenting, than an inline CASE

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