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If we look to the documentation of istream and ostream, we have the following functions :

istream& seekg ( streampos pos );
istream& seekg ( streamoff off, ios_base::seekdir dir );

ostream& seekp ( streampos pos );
ostream& seekp ( streamoff off, ios_base::seekdir dir );

I wonder why there are two form of the functions each time, and not just :

istream& seekg ( streamoff off, ios_base::seekdir dir = ios_base::beg );
ostream& seekp ( streamoff off, ios_base::seekdir dir = ios_base::beg );

What would be the difference between having these two functions instead of the standard four ones ?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

streampos is a typedef for std::fpos<std::char_traits<char>::state_type> which holds the current position in the stream and also the current shift state . Multi-byte encoding schemes such as shift-jis have a state-dependent encoding. What this means basically is that depending on the previous sequence of characters, how you interpret a certain byte in a stream can be different. With streampos you not only hold a position in the stream, but the shift-state at that point in the stream is also stored. Also, because newlines, etc. are interpreted differently on different systems, so logical position in a text file could be different from it's actual physical position. These are some of the reasons why streampos cannot be a simple integer type.

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The iostreams library is fairly complex and involved. The types streampos and streamoff are implementation-defined, and an implementation is not required to make them integers that are related in the way you seem to suggest.

For example, it's feasible that an implementation provide larger, more powerful proxy objects that represent the notion of position and offset, respectively, and in that case the user may wish to be able to seek directly with such an object, rather than by converting one into the other manually.

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The old iostreams streampos is implementation defined. The newer one is a typedef for std::fpos<std::char_traits<char>::state_type> –  Jesse Good Oct 5 '12 at 5:42
    
@JesseGood: OK, but is that one implementation-defined? –  Kerrek SB Oct 5 '12 at 11:01
    
Ok, I see now, so std::fpos is implementation defined. –  Jesse Good Oct 5 '12 at 20:37

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