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So I'm building my app around facebook oauth, and was hoping to use the fbsr_ token to identify logged-in users (so that the facebook-js stuff stays in sync with my site).

Unfortunately, it appears that these fbsr_* cookies are set to expire within a day. Which means if the user comes to my site a day later, they have no cookie and are shown a logged-out experience.

The facebook-js then runs, recognizes them, creates the fbsr_* cookie, and gives me a callback. I can choose to do a hard page refresh (rather jarring), or try to do fancy in-place ajax updating (tons of complex code, still slightly jarring). Is there a reason these cookies don't have a longer expiration so the user stays logged-in seamlessly? Most websites allow you to "remember me" when you log in to avoid constant cookie expirations, so I'd rather not have my facebook-enabled website keep logging me out.

Is there anything I can do about this? I suspect I can probably switch to serverside-oauth where I manage identity and cookie expiration myself (yes?). But it seems strange that clientside-oauth would have such a limitation, so I'm hoping I'm missing something.

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Is there anything I can do about this?

No, not really.

The only way to determine, if a user is currently logged in to Facebook, is to look at the cookie set for the domain facebook.com.

The JS SDK is capable of doing that, because it runs client-side, and can make a cross-domain request to check if these cookies are set.

But there is no way to check for those cookies server-side from your domain – your server only has access to cookies set for your own domain.

I suspect I can probably switch to serverside-oauth where I manage identity and cookie expiration myself (yes?)

If your set your own cookies on your domain, you are implementing your own login system.

And even if you “fake” the cookies that the JS SDK sets under your domain, it would not bring the same results.

There might be a cookie on your domain, that says, “yes, user XYZ is logged in to Facebook” – but that would not have to be the case. I could have logged out of Facebook in the meantime, and your cookies would not reflect that at all. So whatever you’ll try to do next, like f.e. posting something on my behalf from your app, will most likely fail, because you only think I was still logged in to Facebook, but in reality you do not have a valid access token for me any more, since I am not really logged into Facebook.

The facebook-js then runs, recognizes them, creates the fbsr_* cookie, and gives me a callback. I can choose to do a hard page refresh (rather jarring), or try to do fancy in-place ajax updating (tons of complex code, still slightly jarring).

Those are your only viable options.

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Thanks for your answer. Rather unfortunate that while Facebook is pushing to be an oauth system for websites, they have such a fundamental flaw. But if I use serverside-oauth, I would manage my own cookies/login/logout, but tie it to facebook oauth credentials. All client-side facebook-connect-js would not work of course. But I'd have access tokens serverside (that are exchanged for extended tokens), so I'd still be able to perform actions on the user's behalf, even when not logged into facebook. I just have to remember to refresh the token periodically by running through the no-op oauth flow. –  Mike Lambert Oct 6 '12 at 12:14
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