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I have an extremely large database (contacts has ~3 billion entries, people has ~280 million entries, and the other tables have a negligible number of entries). Most other queries I've run are really fast. However, I've encountered a more complicated query that's really slow. I'm wondering if there's any way to speed this up.

First of all, here is my schema:

CREATE TABLE activities (id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY, name TEXT NOT NULL);
CREATE TABLE contacts (
        id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY,
        person1_id INTEGER NOT NULL,
        person2_id INTEGER NOT NULL,
        duration REAL NOT NULL, -- hours
        activity_id INTEGER NOT NULL
    --  FOREIGN_KEY(person1_id) REFERENCES people(id),
    --  FOREIGN_KEY(person2_id) REFERENCES people(id)
    );
CREATE TABLE people (
        id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY,
        state_id INTEGER NOT NULL,
        county_id INTEGER NOT NULL,
        age INTEGER NOT NULL,
        gender TEXT NOT NULL, -- M or F
        income INTEGER NOT NULL
    --  FOREIGN_KEY(state_id) REFERENCES states(id)
    );
CREATE TABLE states (
        id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY,
        name TEXT NOT NULL,
        abbreviation TEXT NOT NULL
    );
CREATE INDEX activities_name_index on activities(name);
CREATE INDEX contacts_activity_id_index on contacts(activity_id);
CREATE INDEX contacts_duration_index on contacts(duration);
CREATE INDEX contacts_person1_id_index on contacts(person1_id);
CREATE INDEX contacts_person2_id_index on contacts(person2_id);
CREATE INDEX people_age_index on people(age);
CREATE INDEX people_county_id_index on people(county_id);
CREATE INDEX people_gender_index on people(gender);
CREATE INDEX people_income_index on people(income);
CREATE INDEX people_state_id_index on people(state_id);
CREATE INDEX states_abbreviation_index on states(abbreviation);
CREATE INDEX states_name_index on states(name);

Note that I've created an index on every column in the database. I don't care about the size of the database; speed is all I care about.

Here's an example of a query that, as expected, runs almost instantly:

SELECT count(*) FROM people, states WHERE people.state_id=states.id and states.abbreviation='IA';

Here's the troublesome query:

SELECT * FROM contacts WHERE rowid IN
    (SELECT contacts.rowid FROM contacts, people, states
        WHERE contacts.person1_id=people.id AND people.state_id=states.id AND states.name='Kansas'
            INTERSECT
    SELECT contacts.rowid FROM contacts, people, states
        WHERE contacts.person2_id=people.id AND people.state_id=states.id AND states.name='Missouri');

Now, what I think would happen is that each subquery would use each relevant index I've created to speed this up. However, when I show the query plan, I see this:

sqlite> EXPLAIN QUERY PLAN SELECT * FROM contacts WHERE rowid IN (SELECT contacts.rowid FROM contacts, people, states WHERE contacts.person1_id=people.id AND people.state_id=states.id AND states.name='Kansas' INTERSECT SELECT contacts.rowid FROM contacts, people, states WHERE contacts.person2_id=people.id AND people.state_id=states.id AND states.name='Missouri');
0|0|0|SEARCH TABLE contacts USING INTEGER PRIMARY KEY (rowid=?) (~25 rows)
0|0|0|EXECUTE LIST SUBQUERY 1
2|0|2|SEARCH TABLE states USING COVERING INDEX states_name_index (name=?) (~1 rows)
2|1|1|SEARCH TABLE people USING COVERING INDEX people_state_id_index (state_id=?) (~5569556 rows)
2|2|0|SEARCH TABLE contacts USING COVERING INDEX contacts_person1_id_index (person1_id=?) (~12 rows)
3|0|2|SEARCH TABLE states USING COVERING INDEX states_name_index (name=?) (~1 rows)
3|1|1|SEARCH TABLE people USING COVERING INDEX people_state_id_index (state_id=?) (~5569556 rows)
3|2|0|SEARCH TABLE contacts USING COVERING INDEX contacts_person2_id_index (person2_id=?) (~12 rows)
1|0|0|COMPOUND SUBQUERIES 2 AND 3 USING TEMP B-TREE (INTERSECT)

In fact, if I show the query plan for the first query I posted, I get this:

sqlite> EXPLAIN QUERY PLAN SELECT count(*) FROM people, states WHERE people.state_id=states.id and states.abbreviation='IA';
0|0|1|SEARCH TABLE states USING COVERING INDEX states_abbreviation_index (abbreviation=?) (~1 rows)
0|1|0|SEARCH TABLE people USING COVERING INDEX people_state_id_index (state_id=?) (~5569556 rows)

And finally, here's a query that does use one of the indices I created just to prove they do get used:

SELECT contacts.* FROM contacts, people, states WHERE contacts.person1_id=people.id AND people.state_id=states.id AND states.name='Iowa';

That query generates the following query plan:

sqlite> EXPLAIN QUERY PLAN SELECT contacts.* FROM contacts, people, states WHERE contacts.person1_id=people.id AND people.state_id=states.id AND states.name='Iowa';
0|0|2|SEARCH TABLE states USING COVERING INDEX states_name_index (name=?) (~1 rows)
0|1|1|SEARCH TABLE people USING COVERING INDEX people_state_id_index (state_id=?) (~5569556 rows)
0|2|0|SEARCH TABLE contacts USING INDEX contacts_person1_id_index (person1_id=?) (~12 rows)

Why is SQLite using covering indices instead of the indices I created? Is this correct behavior?

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3  
The covering indexes are indexes you created. "Covering" means that all the columns needed to fulfill the query can be read from the index without having to resort to reading the actual table data. The slow query is more complex than the other two that you show, but I don't see any fundamental difference with the way it's being evaluated. –  Larry Lustig Oct 5 '12 at 4:04
    
Oh, great! I guess I just misunderstood what a covering index is. This is perfect, then. Thanks! –  Geoff Oct 5 '12 at 4:10

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Thanks to Larry, I simply misunderstood what a covering index is. SQLite is using the indices I created. After thinking about it in the shower, I think it's just because the database is so large that there are a non-trivial number of operations necessary to generate my answer.

Kansas has ~2.6 million people. Missouri has ~5.4 million people. Selecting contacts where person1 is in Kansas takes 2.6 million * log(3 billion) = 2.6 million * 10 = 26 million lookups. Then, I need to do another 54 million lookups to find contacts where person2 is in Missouri.

sqlite> SELECT count(*) FROM contacts, people, states WHERE contacts.person1_id=people.id AND people.state_id=states.id AND states.name='Kansas';
31665994
sqlite> SELECT count(*) FROM contacts, people, states WHERE contacts.person2_id=people.id AND people.state_id=states.id AND states.name='Missouri';
69436970

I now have to perform a set intersection between a set of size ~31.7 million and a set of size ~70 million.

So the slowdown has nothing to do with the database or query design. It's simply a lot of stuff to do.

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