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I'm trying to implement a Discrete Fourier Transformation algorithm for a project I'm doing in school. But creating a class is seeming to be difficult(which it shouldn't be). I'm using Visual Studio 2012.

Basically I need a class called Complex to store the two values I get from a DFT; The real portion and the imaginary portion.

This is what I have so far for that:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace SoundEditor_V3
{
    public class Complex
    {
        public double real;
        public double im;

        public Complex()
        {
            real = 0;
            im = 0;
        }
    }
}

The problem is that it doesn't recognize the constructor as a constructor, I'm just learning C#, but I looked it up online and this is how it's supposed to look. But it recognizes my constructor as a method.

Why is that? Am I creating the class wrong?

It's doing the same thing for my Fourier class as well. So each time I try to create a Fourier object and then use it's method...there is no such thing.

example, I do this:

Fourier fou = new Fourier();
fou.DFT(s, N,  amp, 0);

and it tells me fou is a 'field' but is used like a 'type' why is it saying that?

Here is the code for my Fourier class as well:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace SoundEditor_V3
{
   public class Fourier
   {

        //FOURIER
        //N = number of samples
        //s is the array of samples(data)
        //amp is the array where the complex result will be written to
        //start is the where in the array to start
        public void DFT(byte[] s, int N, ref Complex[] amp, int start)
        {
            Complex tem = new Complex();
            int f;
            int t;

            for (f = 0; f < N; f++)
            {

                tem.real = 0;
                tem.im = 0;

                for (t = 0; t < N; t++)
                {
                    tem.real += s[t + start] * Math.Cos(2 * Math.PI * t * f / N);
                    tem.im -= s[t + start] * Math.Sin(2 * Math.PI * t * f / N);

                }
                amp[f].real = tem.real;
                amp[f].im = tem.im;

            }
        }

        //INVERSE FOURIER
        public void IDFT(Complex[] A, ref int[] s)
        {
            int N = A.Length;
            int t, f;
            double result;
            for (t = 0; t < N; t++)
            {
                result = 0;
                for (f = 0; f < N; f++)
                {
                    result += A[f].real * Math.Cos(2 * Math.PI * t * f / N) - A[f].im * Math.Sin(2 * Math.PI * t * f / N);
                }
                s[t] = (int)Math.Round(result);
            }
        }
    }
}

I'm very much stuck at the moment, any and all help would be appreciated. Thank you.

edit:

this is where I'm trying to access all my classes:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Data;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
using System.Windows.Forms;

namespace SoundEditor_V3
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }


        string filename;
        NAudio.Wave.WaveStream waveStream;

        private NAudio.Wave.DirectSoundOut sout = null;

        private void openToolStripMenuItem_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {

            OpenFileDialog open = new OpenFileDialog();
            open.Filter = "Wave File (*.wav)|*.wav";
            if (open.ShowDialog() != DialogResult.OK)
            {
                return;
            }
            waveStream = new NAudio.Wave.WaveFileReader(open.FileName);
            filename = open.FileName;
            sout = new NAudio.Wave.DirectSoundOut();
            sout.Init(new NAudio.Wave.WaveChannel32(waveStream));

        }

        //Play
        private void Play_btn_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            sout.Play();
        }

        //Stop
        private void Stop_btn_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            sout.Stop();
            waveStream.Position = 0;
        }

        //Pause
        private void Pause_btn_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            sout.Pause();
        }



        //display fourier
        //N = number of samples(length of array)
        //s is the array of samples(data)
        //amp is the array where the complex result will be written to
        //start is the where in the array to start
        static int N = 8;
        byte[] s = {1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8};


        Complex[] amp = new Complex[N];

        Fourier xfo = new Fourier();



        //xfo.DFT(s, N,  amp, 0); 

    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Show us the declaration of amp –  Adriaan Stander Oct 5 '12 at 3:43
    
are there any other errors? –  prashanth Oct 5 '12 at 3:48
1  
Also, this may seem weird but post the entire file for your use of the classes instead of those two lines. There are some very silly typos in the file that will cause these errors. –  Jonathan Henson Oct 5 '12 at 3:49
    
Are those lines in a method? You could get that error if you try to write that code in the class body outside of a method. –  Mike Dour Oct 5 '12 at 3:52
    
and make sure to use ref keyword while passing amp parameter –  prashanth Oct 5 '12 at 4:05

4 Answers 4

This call should be inside a method. As of now, it looks its directly under a class.

//xfo.DFT(s, N,  amp, 0);

Also add ref for amp. (As the void DFT(...., ref Complex[] amp,....) takes a ref amp parameter.

xfo.DFT(s, N, ref amp, 0);
share|improve this answer
    
I agree with the inside a method as the right answer, but not the need for ref. Based on the code it doesn't add anything. –  btlog Oct 5 '12 at 4:28
    
@btlog see my update. the void DFT(..) takes a "ref Complex[] amp" parameter. –  prashanth Oct 5 '12 at 4:31

Oh boy, so much room to improve.

First you are using the class Complex as a struct, in fact there is no need for it to be a class, so make it a struct:

public struct Complex
{
    public double Imaginary;
    public double Real;
}

No constructor needed, the default constructor (which the compilers add) will set the fields to their default value according to their type, and for double the default value is 0.0 (which is what you are assigning to them anyway*).

I have also renamed im to Imaginary, and don't tell me you have to type more because you got intellisense. If you didn't go download Mono Develop or Visual Studio Express. Oh, I can feel your thinking: we shouldn't relay on the tools. Well, that's right, and that is another reason to write code that is easy to read, even for those unfamiliar with the concepts (it also makes searching easier).

*: I want to note that 0 is a intenger literal and 0.0 is double, but the compiler reconizes this and optimizes the conversion away, so it is the same for practical purposes.

Let's move to your fourier class, first the method DFT, which I copy below (with the names of the fields of Complex renamed):

    //FOURIER
    //N = number of samples
    //s is the array of samples(data)
    //amp is the array where the complex result will be written to
    //start is the where in the array to start
    public void DFT(byte[] s, int N, ref Complex[] amp, int start)
    {
        Complex tem = new Complex();
        int f;
        int t;

        for (f = 0; f < N; f++)
        {

            tem.real = 0;
            tem.im = 0;

            for (t = 0; t < N; t++)
            {
                tem.real += s[t + start] * Math.Cos(2 * Math.PI * t * f / N);
                tem.im -= s[t + start] * Math.Sin(2 * Math.PI * t * f / N);
            }
            amp[f].real = tem.real;
            amp[f].im = tem.im;

        }
    }

The first thing to notice is that you say that N is the number of samples and s is the samples array. Well, if you have an array you can query the size of the array, which is a good idea even if you want to allow to only process a portion of the array (I think you want that). But, really N and s?

Look, it's like magic:

   //FOURIER
   //amp is the array where the complex result will be written to
   //start is the where in the array to start
   public void DFT(byte[] samples, int samplesCount, ref Complex[] amp, int start)
   {
       Complex tem = new Complex();
       int f;
       int t;

       for (f = 0; f < samplesCount; f++)
       {

           tem.Real = 0;
           tem.Imaginary = 0;

           for (t = 0; t < samplesCount; t++)
           {
               tem.Imaginary += samples[t + start] * Math.Cos(2 * Math.PI * t * f / samplesCount);
               tem.Imaginary -= samples[t + start] * Math.Sin(2 * Math.PI * t * f / samplesCount);
           }
           amp[f].Real = tem.Real;
           amp[f].Imaginary = tem.Imaginary;
       }
   }

Ok, next you say that amp is the output. Well if it is the output, why don't you make it te method return it?

Bam!

   //FOURIER
   //start is the where in the array to start
   Complex[] DFT(byte[] samples, int samplesCount, int start)
   {
       var = new Complex[samplesCount];
       Complex tem = new Complex();
       int f;
       int t;
       for (f = 0; f < samplesCount; f++)
       {

           tem.Real = 0;
           tem.Imaginary = 0;

           for (t = 0; t < samplesCount; t++)
           {
               tem.Imaginary += samples[t + start] * Math.Cos(2 * Math.PI * t * f / samplesCount);
               tem.Imaginary -= samples[t + start] * Math.Sin(2 * Math.PI * t * f / samplesCount);
           }
           result[f].Real = tem.Real;
           result[f].Imaginary = tem.Imaginary;
       }
       return result;
   }

Does it really need to be an array? I think this is a good oportunity to use the yield keyword and return IEnumerable<Complex>. But I'll take that you want, in deed, an array.

Now, may be you didn't want to return an array. May be you want to just modify portions of a preexisting array. In that case you should start checking your bounds. And even if that were true, you don't need ref at all! because the array is a reference type. It is a reference passed by value, if you cannot wrap your mind around that idea, just trust me, you can modify the contents of an array and see that reflected outside without ref... passing a reference by reference allows you to change the reference by another one, and you are not doing that.

To demostrate:

void Main()
{
    var x = new int[1];
    Do(x);
    Console.WriteLine(x);
}

void Do (int[] array)
{
    array[0] = 1;
}

The output of the previous program (compiled with LinqPad) is "1".

But let's get back to your code, shall we?

I don't know what are f and t. Thankfully I knew that im was imaginary (it was, right?). So I'll not rename them. But I'll move their definition to the loops:

   Complex[] DFT(byte[] samples, int samplesCount, int start)
   {
       var result = new Complex[samplesCount];
       Complex tem = new Complex();
       for (int f = 0; f < samplesCount; f++)
       {
           tem.Real = 0;
           tem.Imaginary = 0;
           for (int t = 0; t < samplesCount; t++)
           {
               tem.Imaginary += samples[t + start] * Math.Cos(2 * Math.PI * t * f / samplesCount);
               tem.Imaginary -= samples[t + start] * Math.Sin(2 * Math.PI * t * f / samplesCount);

           }
           result[f].Real = tem.Real;
           result[f].Imaginary = tem.Imaginary;
       }
       return result;
   }

Note my use of the var keyword. With it the compiler assigns the type of the variable to the type of what I'm using to initialize it. So in this case result is a Complex[] but I did not have to write that twice in the code.

And finally, that part where you copy the contents of the Complex object, well, I'll change that too. Why? Because Complex now is a struct, and structs are valuetypes. So it's content gets copied instead of a reference.

   //FOURIER
   //start is the where in the array to start
   Complex[] DFT(byte[] samples, int samplesCount, int start)
   {
       var result = new Complex[samplesCount];
       Complex tem = new Complex();
       for (int f = 0; f < samplesCount; f++)
       {
           tem.Real = 0;
           tem.Imaginary = 0;
           for (int t = 0; t < samplesCount; t++)
           {
               tem.Imaginary += samples[t + start] * Math.Cos(2 * Math.PI * t * f / samplesCount);
               tem.Imaginary -= samples[t + start] * Math.Sin(2 * Math.PI * t * f / samplesCount);

           }
           result[f] = tem;
       }
       return result;
   }

I know you really want to proccess just a part of your array. But bear with me... you will learn a few things and that code will be useful anyway.

The next thing I want is to return an IEnumerable<Complex> which is an interface that represents anything that can be iterated to get objects of type Complex. I'll also use the yield keyword.

Additionally I've got rid of sampleCount and use samples.Length instead.

Just look how beautiful it gets:

    //FOURIER
    public IEnumerable<Complex> DFT(byte[] samples, int startIndex)
    {
        int samplesLength = samples.Length;
        for (int f = 0; f < samplesLength; f++)
        {
            Complex resultItem = new Complex();
            for (int t = 0; t < samplesLength; t++)
            {
                resultItem.Real += samples[t + startIndex] * Math.Cos(2 * Math.PI * t * f / samplesLength);
                resultItem.Imaginary -= samples[t + startIndex] * Math.Sin(2 * Math.PI * t * f / samplesLength);
            }
            yield return resultItem;
        }
    }

In fact, I'll get rid of startIndex too (we are not checking bounds anyway*).

*: that is, we are not checking if the index are inside the array size. I know, I know, you was going to add them later... probably.

Anyway, you are learning some C# here.

    //FOURIER
    public IEnumerable<Complex> DFT(byte[] samples)
    {
        int samplesLength = samples.Length;
        for (int f = 0; f < samplesLength; f++)
        {
            Complex resultItem = new Complex();
            for (int t = 0; t < samplesLength; t++)
            {
                resultItem.Real += samples[t] * Math.Cos(2 * Math.PI * t * f / samplesLength);
                resultItem.Imaginary -= samples[t] * Math.Sin(2 * Math.PI * t * f / samplesLength);
            }
            yield return resultItem;
        }
    }

Well, the next thing that bothers me is the fact that the class Fourier has no state (it has no fields, or any variable which value is persisted... somehow). So, make it a static class with a static method:

public static class Fourier
{
    //FOURIER
    public static IEnumerable<Complex> DFT(byte[] samples)
    {
        int samplesLength = samples.Length;
        for (int f = 0; f < samplesLength; f++)
        {
            Complex resultItem = new Complex();
            for (int t = 0; t < samplesLength; t++)
            {
                resultItem.Real += samples[t] * Math.Cos(2 * Math.PI * t * f / samplesLength);
                resultItem.Imaginary -= samples[t] * Math.Sin(2 * Math.PI * t * f / samplesLength);
            }
            yield return resultItem;
        }
    }
}

Of course you notice I haven't added IDFT. That one is homework.

Now, let's see how you use it. In my case I created a ConsoleApplication, just to have it up and running fast (no time wasted designing a GUI).

What I want is to call Fourier.DFT which I can without an object of type Fourier because it is static (In fact I cannot create an object of type Fourier because it is static).

This method recieves an argument of type byte[]. That one will be new byte[] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 }. And that method will return something I can use to iterate over to get objects of type Complex. So I want to put it a loop.

This is how my code looks like:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        //display fourier
        foreach (var item in Fourier.DFT(new byte[] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 }))
        {
            Console.WriteLine(item);
        }
    }
}

Now... the output is... drum roll...

Well, I can't see it, I forgot Console.ReadLine(); but after adding that the output is...

Namespace.Complex
Namespace.Complex
Namespace.Complex
Namespace.Complex
Namespace.Complex
Namespace.Complex
Namespace.Complex
Namespace.Complex

Wait, what? It happens that I haven't told it how to convert an object of type Complex to string. So let's add that:

public struct Complex
{
    public double Imaginary;
    public double Real;

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return string.Format("Complex [Real: {0}, Imaginary: {1}]", Real, Imaginary);
    }
}

Now my output is:

Complex [Real: 36, Imaginary: 0]
Complex [Real: -4, Imaginary: 9,65685424949238]
Complex [Real: -4, Imaginary: 4]
Complex [Real: -4, Imaginary: 1,65685424949239]
Complex [Real: -4, Imaginary: -3,91874033223161E-15]
Complex [Real: -4,00000000000001, Imaginary: -1,65685424949239]
Complex [Real: -4,00000000000002, Imaginary: -4,00000000000001]
Complex [Real: -3,99999999999997, Imaginary: -9,65685424949237]

Is the output correct? I have no freaking idea! I have to learn more about Fourier (but it looks legit).

After verification, the output is correct.


One final note: Step trhoug the code with a debuger, you may find a surprise (hint: yield).

share|improve this answer

You need a method, try this:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace SoundEditor_V3
{
    public class Complex
    {
        public double real;
        public double im;

        public Complex()
        {
            real = 0;
            im = 0;
        }

        public Setval (double newReal, double newIm)
        {
            real = newReal;
            im = newIm;
        }
    }
}

In regards to your other class, where is the constructor? ;)

share|improve this answer
    
Complex tem = new Complex(); is simply initialising the Complex class and setting the type and im variables to 0. With the method posted above, instead of tem.real = 0; tem.im = 0; simply replace with tem(0,0);. Edit: An even better way would be to create getter/setter so you can perform your calculations in the Fourier class. –  JuStDaN Oct 5 '12 at 4:00
    
well, it was supposed to be the Public Complex() { real = 0; im = 0;} but this error occurs even without a constructor declaration. Maybe I'm making the constructors wrong? –  Lucifer Fayte Oct 5 '12 at 4:01
    
Sorry mate, where I mentioned tem(0,0), it should actually be tem.SetVal(0,0). I edited the code above to reflect the change. –  JuStDaN Oct 5 '12 at 4:07
    
No worries. I do end up doing the calculations I need in the fourier class, but then I need to do pythagorous on the values DFT gives me. So I need to store them in Complex, but I need to make an array of Complex objects. I was using a struct before, which seemed to work ok, but the teacher insisted it would be better to implement Complex as a class –  Lucifer Fayte Oct 5 '12 at 4:13
    
@LuciferFayte so you actually need an array. Anyway, come to think about it, you are using Visual Stuido 2012... then you could use System.Numerics.Complex that was added in .NET 4.0 (and it is a struct). –  Theraot Oct 6 '12 at 19:44
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Thank you for all your help; I actually ended up figuring everything out. I couldn't access methods in the area I was trying to access them in. I had to put them inside a method block because this was all being coded inside a form. That's my understanding anyway.

But again, thank you for all your suggestions, they were all helpful.

share|improve this answer

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