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See these code as below:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

int main()
{
 char a[1000];
 int i;
 for(i = 1;i<1000;i++)
 {
  a[i] = 5;
 }

 printf("%d\n",strlen(a));

 return 0;
}

the result is 0 , why? Any explanation will be appreciated.

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mmm... free food... Darn you making me hungry at 1 in the morning. –  chris Oct 5 '12 at 4:44
    
Indeed. I noticed your comments on a couple saying thanks and how it helped. The proper way to say thanks like that is to accept them. –  chris Oct 5 '12 at 4:48

3 Answers 3

You never assign or intialize a[0]. In this case, it just happened to be '\0', so strlen(a) returns 0.

It's worth noting that calling strlen on a here is undefined behaviour, as you're indirectly trying to read that uninitialized, garbage memory that is a[0] as the first step on the search to find a null terminator. Even setting that to 0 explicitly would still cause problems with it running off of the end of the array until it finds a 0, crashes, or blows up.

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+9 in 2 min... damn. is that a new record? Here, have another one! –  Mysticial Oct 5 '12 at 4:45
    
@Mysticial, It always seems to be the simplest ones that do that up to a point. I think your comprehensive one blew this, or anything like it, out of the water, though. –  chris Oct 5 '12 at 4:46
    
Nope, that one only got to +6 in the first 2 min. –  Mysticial Oct 5 '12 at 4:52
    
I think some explanation on array initialization is needed: when you declare an array and dont initialize it default constructors for its elements are called. In this situation constructors for char() will be invoked. Therefore as value of zero element wasn`t changed in the loop it remains zero - here is no undefined behaviour. –  spin_eight Oct 5 '12 at 10:16
1  
@spin_eight - what you say is true of non-POD types, but false of fundemental types. See C++2003, §8.5 ¶9: "Otherwise, if no initializer is specified for a nonstatic object, the object and its subobjects, if any, have an indeterminate initial value." –  Robᵩ Oct 5 '12 at 14:32

strlen() starts counting from 0 not 1. Do this and you will be going:

for(i = 0;i<1000;i++)

share|improve this answer
 #include<stdio.h>
 #include<stdlib.h>
 int main()
 {
     char a[1000];
     int i;
     for(i = 0;i<1000;i++)//starts with 0 not 1
       a[i] = 5;
     a[i] = '\0';//NULL terminator shall be there 
     printf("%d\n",strlen(a));//1000

     return 0;
 }
share|improve this answer
    
In your code, you're accessing element with index 1000. This code has undefined behavior. –  Armen Tsirunyan Feb 4 '13 at 18:32

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