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I have an API that I would like to change the behavior of. I originally made method is_success mean a "green light", but a "red light" is not exceptional, it still means the light is working properly. I would now like is_success to only be false in the event of a suggestion, and have added is_green and is_red (note: there are also statuses "yellow" and "purple") to my API to complement specific checks ( currently yellow and purple throw exceptions, but may get status checks later ).

Is there any good way that I can give warnings from the code that the behavior is changing? or has changed? while allowing those warnings to be turned off if the user is aware? (note: have already put a deprecation notice in the change log )

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3 Answers 3

You could use Perl's lexical warnings categories. There is a deprecated category or you could register the package/module as a warnings category.

{
    package My::Foo;
    use warnings;

    sub method {
        (@_ <= 2) or warnings::warnif('deprecated', 'invoking ->method with ... ')
    }
}

{
    package My::Bar;
    use warnings;
    use warnings::register;

    sub method {
        (@_ <= 2) or warnings::warnif('invoking ->method with ... ')
    }
}

{
    use warnings;
    My::Foo->method(1);
    My::Foo->method(1, 2);
    My::Bar->method(1, 2);
}

{
    no warnings 'deprecated';
    My::Foo->method(1, 2);
    no warnings 'My::Bar';
    My::Bar->method(1, 2);
}

See warnings and perllexwarn

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Yes, you can use the warn command. It will display warnings but they can also be trapped by specifying an empty sub for $SIG{'WARN'}, which will stop the messages from deing displayed.

# warnings are thrown out with this BEGIN block in your code.
BEGIN {
  $SIG{'__WARN__'} = sub {  }
}

# prints the warning to STDOUT, if $SIG{'__WARN__'} is set to the default
warn "uh oh, this is deprecated!";

See the perdocs for more info and additional examples, http://perldoc.perl.org/functions/warn.html and http://perldoc.perl.org/perllexwarn.html.

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oddly it hadn't occurred to me that warnings can be disabled... I have been using carp for other deprecations this one was just different because I'm not planning on removing the API, I'm planning on changing the behavior in a way that could go unnoticed. –  xenoterracide Oct 5 '12 at 6:16
    
The $SIG{'__WARN__'} handler is powerful but easily abused. This will suppress all warnings even those that are important and unrelated to the deprecation. It also could clobber, or be clobbered by another change to the $SIG{'__WARN__'} handler. –  Ven'Tatsu Oct 5 '12 at 14:50

I've always found the method used by MIME::Head useful and amusing.

This method has been deprecated. See "decode_headers" in MIME::Parser for the full reasons. If you absolutely must use it and don't like the warning, then provide a FORCE:

"I_NEED_TO_FIX_THIS" Just shut up and do it. Not recommended. Provided only for those who need to keep old scripts functioning.

"I_KNOW_WHAT_I_AM_DOING" Just shut up and do it. Not recommended. Provided for those who REALLY know what they are doing.

The idea is that the deprecation warning can be suppressed only by providing a magic argument that documents why the warning is being suppressed.

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