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I have been googling about this problem and couldn't find any good websites.... I want to create buttons and entry widget looks like:

[A] [B] [C] [D] [E] [F]

[ENTRYWIDGET HERE] [OK]

My code looks like:

class Controller(Frame):

def __init__(self,parent):
    Frame.__init__(self, parent)
    self.parent = parent
    self.button1 = Button(parent, text = "A")
    self.button1.pack(side = TOP)
    self.button1 = Button(parent, text = "B")
    self.button1.pack(side = TOP)
    self.button1 = Button(parent, text = "C")
    self.button1.pack(side = TOP)
    self.button1 = Button(parent, text = "D")
    self.button1.pack(side = TOP)
    self.button1 = Button(parent, text = "E")
    self.button1.pack(side = TOP)
    self.button1 = Button(parent, text = "F")
    self.button1.pack(side = TOP)

    self.myentrybox = Entry(parent, width = 50)
    self.myentrybox.pack(side = LEFT)
    self.button = Button(parent, text = "OK")
    self.button.pack(side = RIGHT )

And this looks completely different with what i'm trying to create..

Any feedbacks would be so grateful thanks.

share|improve this question
    
you should put what library your using ... I dont think its wx... –  Joran Beasley Oct 5 '12 at 5:18
    
You need use one of the layout or geometry managers and tell it how to arrange your widgets. –  martineau Oct 5 '12 at 6:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can just put your buttons into another Frame.


Example:

from Tkinter import *
from ttk import *

class Controller(Frame):

    def __init__(self,parent):
        Frame.__init__(self, parent)

        buttons = Frame(parent)
        buttons.pack(side=TOP)
        for letter in 'ABCDEF':
            Button(buttons, text=letter).pack(side=LEFT)

        Entry(parent, width=50).pack(side=LEFT)
        Button(parent, text='OK').pack(side=RIGHT)

root = Tk()
app = Controller(root)
root.mainloop()

Result:

Result

Edit to answer your comments

If you want to stick with for loop for creating the buttons, a good way to apply the event handler is to create a mapping of button <=> function to call using a dict:

    handler = {'A': function_A,
               'B': function_FooBar,
               'C': function_SomeThing}

    for letter, func in ((k, handler[k]) for k in sorted(handler)):
        Button(buttons, text=letter, command=func, width=10).pack(side=LEFT)

This way, it's easily extendable. If you don't care about the order of the buttons, you can just use

for letter, func in handler.items():
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks very much for your reply. In this case, how do I define the commands for each button? –  JuM Oct 5 '12 at 8:28
    
@JuM It depends. What should those Buttons do? Are they somehow related to each other, e.g. call the some method with another parameter or something like this? Are they really named A...F? –  sloth Oct 5 '12 at 8:31
    
yes each button will call different def functions when clicked.. –  JuM Oct 5 '12 at 8:45
    
@JuM See my edit. –  sloth Oct 5 '12 at 9:03

Alternatively, you could use another layout manager, e.g. using the grid() method, which is a bit more expressive.

def __init__(self,parent=None):
    Frame.__init__(self, parent)
    self.grid()
    # create buttons in row 1
    for i, c in enumerate("ABCDEF"):
        self.button = Button(parent, text=c)
        self.button.grid(row=1, column=i+1)
    # create textfield and 'ok' in row 2    
    self.myentrybox = Entry(parent, width = 50)
    self.myentrybox.grid(row=2, column=1, columnspan=6)
    self.button = Button(parent, text = "OK")
    self.button.grid(row=2, column=7)
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