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In the book The C++ Programming Language, by Bjarne Stroustrup, the author says:

Sometimes when you design a library, it is necessary, or simply convenient, to invent a type with a constructor and a destructor with the sole purpose of initialization and cleanup. Such a type would be used once only: to allocate a static object so that the constructor and the destructor are called. For example:

 class  Zlib_init
{
    Zlib_init() ; //get Zlib ready for use
   ~Zlib_init()  ; //clean up after Zlib
};
Class Zlib
{
   static  Zlib_init   x;
   /  /...
};

Unfortunately, it is not guaranteed that such an object is initialized before its first use and destroyed after its last use in a program consisting of separately compiled units.

Why does the author keep the constructor and destructor as private members? And why won't this method work if we use it in a program consisting of seperately compiled units? Won't it require definition of the member x for calling the constructor Zlib_init() and destructor ~Zlib_init()? Then what is the use of this method? It's in section 10.4.9 of the book.

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2  
that is not going to compile - for multiple reasons –  BЈовић Oct 5 '12 at 5:56
1  
that seems more illustrative than an actual demonstration of working code... –  nneonneo Oct 5 '12 at 5:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Why does the author keep the constructor and destructor as private members?

The constructor & destructor being private seems to be a typo.
Class static members needs to be defined in order that you can use them. In order that the static member x is defined the constructor needs to be accessible. if not the linker will complain about undefined reference.

Online Sample:

class  Zlib_init 
{    
   Zlib_init() ; //get Zlib ready for use  
  ~Zlib_init()  ; //clean up after Zlib 
   public:
     int j;
};
class Zlib 
{  
   public:  
   static  Zlib_init   x;    
}; 

Zlib_init Zlib::x;

int main()
{
    Zlib::x.j = 10;

    return 0;
}

Output:

prog.cpp:3: error: ‘Zlib_init::Zlib_init()’ is private     
prog.cpp:14: error: within this context      
prog.cpp: In static member function ‘static void Zlib::__static_initialization_and_destruction_0(int, int)’:     
prog.cpp:4: error: ‘Zlib_init::~Zlib_init()’ is private     
prog.cpp:14: error: within this context     

And why won't this method work if we use it in a program consisting of seperately compiled units?

If you fix the typo mentioned above by making the constructor and destructor public or by making Zlib a friend of class Zlib_init the code still faces another problem.
The problem is popularly known as Static Initialization Fiasco in C++.

Good Read:

[10.14] What's the "static initialization order fiasco"?
[10.17] How do I prevent the "static initialization order fiasco" for my static data members?

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1  
Thanks for the reply and for the additional information on static initialization fiasco.. –  sajas Oct 5 '12 at 7:02
    
Typos happen from time to time in B.Stroustrup's books and articles. I guess, this is the code that he writes by heart. Having no time to test. –  SChepurin Oct 8 '12 at 10:27

Why does the author keep the constructor and destructor as private members?

I'm only guessing, but I assume that the author stripped down the declaration to the bare minimum neccessary to convey his idea. Although a struct instead of a class would have worked just as well, and in other places of his book the author uses an ellipsis (…) in such cases. So I'm not sure.

And why won't this method work if we use it in a program consisting of seperately compiled units?

The constructor of a static object will run before main, so if you only use Zlib in stuff called from main, everything works well. The problems start if some other static object in some other compilation unit attempts to use Zlib in its constructor. There are no guarantees about the order in which these two constructors get executed, so you might end up by some code trying to use an uninitialized Zlib class.

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