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I have a the following tables

  • students(sid, sname, age)
  • course(cid, cname, duration)
  • enroll(sid, cid, date)

Find sids of students who have taken java or rdbms

select sid 
from enroll e, 
     course c 
where (c.cname like 'java' and c.cid=e.cid) 
   or (c.cname like 'rdbms' and c.cid=e.cid);

Alternatively:

select sid 
from enroll e, 
     course c 
where cname like 'java' and c.cid=e.cid
union 
select sid 
from enroll e, 
     course c 
where cname like 'rdbms' and c.cid=e.cid;

2nd alternative:

select sid 
from enroll 
where cid in (select cid 
              from course 
              where cname like 'java' 
                 or cname like 'rdbms');

All the above queires get me the expected results.

To find sids of students who have taken java and rdbms, I just modified all the 3 but 1st and 3rd queries below don't work.

select sid 
from enroll e, 
     course c 
where (c.cname like 'java' and c.cid=e.cid) 
  and (c.cname like 'rdbms' and c.cid=e.cid);

Alternative:

select sid 
from enroll e, 
     course c 
where cname like 'java' and c.cid=e.cid
intersect 
select sid 
from enroll e, 
     course c 
where cname like 'rdbms' and c.cid=e.cid;

2nd alternative:

select sid 
from enroll 
where cid in (select cid 
              from course 
              where cname like 'java' and cname like 'rdbms');
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2  
Please avoid using the archaic (pre-1992) comma-separated list of tables in the FROM clause; use the explicit JOIN notation. Please also format your queries to avoid the horizontal scroll bar. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 5 '12 at 6:24
1  
Using LIKE when there is no metacharacter is a bit wasteful, though the optimizer will probably convert it to an equality operation. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 5 '12 at 6:26
1  
cname like 'java' and cname like 'rdbms' think of what you are saying there: "give me all rows where cname is java and rdbms. A single value cannot have two different values at the same time –  a_horse_with_no_name Oct 5 '12 at 6:35
    
@JonathanLeffler - ANSI joins in Oracle don't always perform as well as joins written using the "archaic" syntax. Although in the latest versions this is only an issue with particularly complex queries. Here's a for instance: jonathanlewis.wordpress.com/2012/07/16/ansi-outer-2 –  APC Oct 5 '12 at 9:42
    
However, I agree that with a simple test case like this, in a public forum, the ANSI syntax is better manners. –  APC Oct 5 '12 at 9:43
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4 Answers

One way to write the OR query is:

SELECT DISTINCT sid
  FROM enroll e JOIN course c ON c.cid = e.cid
 WHERE c.cname IN ('java', 'rdbms');

One way to write the AND query is:

SELECT DISTINCT sid
  FROM enroll e JOIN course c ON c.cid = e.cid
 WHERE c.cname IN ('java', 'rdbms')
 GROUP BY sid
HAVING COUNT(*) = 2;

This requires that two rows appear in the enrollment table for the selected students, one for each course (assuming that a student can't enroll twice for a single course). If they can, then you need something like COUNT(DISTINCT cid) = 2 in the HAVING clause.


Analyzing your non-working queries:

select sid 
from enroll e, 
     course c 
where (c.cname like 'java' and c.cid=e.cid) 
  and (c.cname like 'rdbms' and c.cid=e.cid);

This could be written more clearly, perhaps, as:

SELECT sid 
  FROM enroll e JOIN course c ON c.cid = e.cid
 WHERE (c.cname = 'java' AND c.cname = 'rdbms');

Now, if a course name is 'java', it clearly isn't 'rdbms' and vice versa, so no single row can satisfy the conditions. You have to analyze two rows with the same sid. Thus, this query is not complex enough to answer the question.

2nd alternative:

select sid 
from enroll 
where cid in (select cid 
              from course 
              where cname like 'java' and cname like 'rdbms');

This runs into the same issue; there cannot be a single row in the Course table where the cname is simultaneously 'java' and 'rdbms'.

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The reason why the first and third is not working is that they states that cname should be both 'java' and 'rdbms' at the same time! The third query could be rewritten like this:

select distinct sid 
  from enroll 
  where cid in (select cid 
                  from course 
                where cname like 'java' or cname like 'rdbms');

This should give you all records in students that have taken either java or rdbms cources.

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try this

select sid 
from enroll e
where exists(select 0
              from course c
              where c.cname like 'java'
                and c.cid = e.cid)
  and exists(select 0
              from course c
              where c.cname like 'rdbms'
                and c.cid = e.cid)

good luck

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I suggest that you provide more information than 'do not work'. You should describe what you are expecting and what you are getting.

Having said that, I can suggest a query to replace the first one, that gets you sid's that took both java and rdbms:

select distinct sid 
from enroll e, course c 
where c.cid=e.cid
and c.cname in ('java','rdbms');

There are a number of different ways to do this, and there may be a better way depending on your final requirement. No doubt someone will suggest a 'better' way, but it really depends on the final requirement.

Your last query doesn't work because this part of it:

select cid from course where cname like 'java' and cname like 'rdbms'

is saying get me a course record where the course name is java and the course name is rdbms

Of course no such record can ever exist. It's like saying introduce me to a person whose name is Fred and whose name is Bob.

Also depending on the RDBMS, using like without a wildcard character will also get you no result.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry I notice it's Oracle. In this case, LIKE 'java' will only get you records that are exactly 'java'. If you want records that contain java then you want to use LIKE '%java%' instead. Also note that Oracle is case sensitive, so it won't pick up Java or JAVA –  ElectricLlama Oct 5 '12 at 6:30
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