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I have the two following classes:

public class Parent{
    static internal const _name:String = "Parent";

    public function get name():String{
        return _name;
    }
}

public class Child{
    static internal const _name:String = "Child";
}

If I create an instance of class Child and call its name() getter, since it will call the name() method it inherits from Parent, it returns "Parent". I could, of course, override the name() method:

public class Child{
    static internal const _name:String = "Child";

    override public function get name():String{
        return _name;
    }
}

That returns "Child". However, it seems silly to have to copy the exact same code of the method from the parent. Is there any simpler way to do this?

share|improve this question
    
is it na instance name you need similar to the DisplaysObject name property? or you wan't to have a class name available? –  Lukasz 'Severiaan' Grela Oct 5 '12 at 6:52
    
it is just a simplification of the real problem. in real life, my constant is not called name and it is a more complex data structure that I want to make static, since it is shared by all instances of the class –  Eduardo Oct 5 '12 at 6:53
    
Maybe it's me but I fail to see the issue. If you are extending a class you also inherit the class properties. If you want to override the definition of one of the class properties then you have to override it. You might want to rethink your design. –  The_asMan Oct 5 '12 at 14:24
    
It is not a huge issue. I was just wondering if there was a cleaner way, that didn't involve copying and pasting a method definition from the parent to the child class, since it would be identical. I have found that using the prototype object (as described in the self-answer I posted) solves the problem and it works quite well. –  Eduardo Oct 5 '12 at 14:33
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5 Answers

I would take a different approach by making the "name" property a requirement for the parent's constructor:

public class Parent
{
    static internal var _name : String;

    public function Parent(name : String = "Parent") {
        _name = name;
    }

    public function get name() : String {
        return _name;
    }
}

Child Class:

public class Child extends Parent
{   
    public function Child() {
        super("Child");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
But _name is static, so it is shared by all the instances. But it is a good point, I will change _name from being a var to being a const. –  Eduardo Oct 5 '12 at 6:44
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Firstly, you cannot override static methods or properties - they are not inherited, so no override for them.

Secondly, if you declared a constant to be of a complex type, it is not really a constant. I.e. if it is an object, then you can change its keys / values, if it is an array, you can add / remove members and so on.

But the desire to make this functionality more generic is understandable. So, what I'd do:

Have some property outside both parent and child, let say in class X, or package Y. Let it be package Y. So, you'd create a dictionary in package Y, let it be Y.names and in your name getter you'd do:

import Y.names;
. . .
public function get name() {
    return names[(this as Object).constructor];
}

your names variable would be:

package Y {

    public var names:Dictionary = generateNames();

    internal function generateNames():Dictionary {
        var result:Dictionary = new Dictionary();
        result[ChildClass] = "child";
        result[ParentClass] = "parent";
        . . .
        return result;
    }
}

This way it would be sufficient to only implement name getter in super-class, and all inheriting classes will be able to use super-class code as is, no need to change anything. However, this means that some (maybe important) information pertaining to this class will be stored elsewhere (may be difficult to find, this is not the common way people program in AS3).

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This would work. I am not so happy about having to modify generateNames() every time I create a new child class, though. My Parent base class is something that I would like to reuse in a number of projects by just subclassing it. –  Eduardo Oct 5 '12 at 8:09
    
As wvxvw said constants are set once so just get rid of constant keyword - just static will do as that is waht you want - same access from all instances of the class. –  Lukasz 'Severiaan' Grela Oct 5 '12 at 9:17
    
Yes, at this point, I don't really mind if it is a var or a const. I just put it there after manatube posted his answer, to make my question clearer. However, I would like to keep my classes sealed and not have to go back and change a method every time I have to inherit a new class from the base class. –  Eduardo Oct 5 '12 at 9:48
    
+1 for specifying that static methods / properties are not inherited. I like to say that static methods/properties exist on the class not on the instance of the class. –  JeffryHouser Oct 5 '12 at 12:47
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your implementation of get name should look like this, then the getter is one and each of the new classes needs to have it's own public static var _name defined:

//in the base class
    public function get name():String 
    {
        var _sName:String;
        if ((this as Object).constructor._name)
        {
            _sName = (this as Object).constructor._name; 
        }
        else
        {
            try
            {
                var o:Object = getSuperClass(this);
                while (o)
                {
                    if (o._name)
                    {
                        _sName = o._name;
                        break;
                    }
                    o =  getSuperClass(o);
                }
            }
            catch (e:*)
            {}
        }
        return _sName;
    }
//as found here: http://www.actionscriptdeveloper.co.uk/getting-the-class-of-an-object-in-as3/
public static function getSuperClass(o: Object): Object
{
    var n: String = getQualifiedSuperclassName(o);
    if (n == null)
        return(null);

    return getDefinitionByName(n);
}

the static members can be accessed only via class reference which we can get from constructor object, "this" will point to the current class in the inheritance chain so you can call this in parent class and it will point to a Child in a Child class.

[EDIT] I've modified it so it tests for existance of the public static property _name if not found on "this" instance then in a loop the parent class is checked until one is found - like inheritance:)

I'm using this feature to create clone method: constructor as helper in clone method implementation

best regards

share|improve this answer
    
I looks very interesting, and I have a hunch that this will solve it, but I just tried it and I am getting null as a result. –  Eduardo Oct 5 '12 at 7:01
    
I made a few tests, and it does work if I change _name to being public instead of private. However, it does not work if I don't define _name in my Child class (it does not inherit from the parent). –  Eduardo Oct 5 '12 at 7:18
    
maybe give more details about your problem so we can see your use case to which it will be easier to match solution:) –  Lukasz 'Severiaan' Grela Oct 5 '12 at 7:50
    
I am trying to write a base class for objects that I want to serialize to JSON and back. I am having a bit of trouble with IList variables and their serialization back from JSON arrays. To solve the issue, I was thinking of having a class property that could optionally be overridden by descendant classes, that would hold the information on how to map those variables. –  Eduardo Oct 5 '12 at 7:56
    
I have plus-oned your answer because it is what has led me to discovering the prototype object. I think what you are doing in your code is more or less what prototype does. –  Eduardo Oct 5 '12 at 10:19
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I have found something that seems to work. Any feedback is greatly appreciated:

public class Parent{
    prototype._name = "Parent";

    public function get name():String{
        return this["_name"];
    }
}

public class Child{
    prototype._name = "Child";
}
share|improve this answer
    
I agree. In the use cases I have, though, it seems to work. I just hope I am not missing some big drawback. –  Eduardo Oct 5 '12 at 8:03
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Why don't you store such a constant within a corresponding function instead of declaring an inaccessible constant?

class Parent {
    ...
    public function get name():String { return 'Parent'; }
}
class Child extends Parent {
    ...
    override public function get name():String { return 'Child'; }
}

By the way, if your Parent class is a descendant of DisplayObject, you should be careful with name property, as it's needed sometimes by operating code, e.g. getChildByName().

share|improve this answer
    
Nice and simple solution. Do you know if what gets returned would be a static object or if it would get allocated every time the function gets called? (In real life, it will not be a string but an Object, and it will not be called "name") –  Eduardo Oct 5 '12 at 11:05
    
Sorry, can't help with allocations, as this is an untreaded ground for me. I expect this to be a dynamic result. However, anything that's actually happening with strings in AS3 is pretty well hidden behind Flash engine, maybe one shouldn't over-optimize this department. –  Vesper Oct 5 '12 at 11:08
    
I just ran a small test and a new Object would get allocated every time you call the function. :( –  Eduardo Oct 5 '12 at 11:12
    
If so, then your way seems most optimal, even if not so simple. Life isn't always both simple and efficient. –  Vesper Oct 5 '12 at 11:20
    
I actually like the way of using the prototype, that I discovered trying to make Lukasz idea work in my particular case. However, since I have never used prototype before, I would like to hear about any gotchas. –  Eduardo Oct 5 '12 at 11:22
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