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I am trying to write lines of code fitting under 80 columns maximum. Thus, I wonder if fully qualifying my variable type is really mandatory ? Assuming the following implementation:

//Baz.h
namespace loggingapi {
namespace attributes {
    class Baz {};
}} // namespaces

// Bar.h
namespace loggingapi {
    namespace attributes {
        class Baz; // forward declare Baz.
    }

    class Biz {
        int f(Baz* b);
    };
} // namespaces

To declare my function parameter type, there are multiple ways ?

  • a) int f(Baz* b);
  • b) OR int f(attributes::Baz* b);
  • c) OR int f(loggingapi::attributes::Baz* b);
  • d) OR int f(::loggingapi::attributes::Baz* b);

In the list above, which definition(s) is/are clearer/ambiguous for the compilers ?

NOTE: You must assume the namespace/parameter/class/function names CANNOT be shortened in the following implementation.

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1  
(c) and (d) are same. –  iammilind Oct 5 '12 at 6:38
3  
(a) won't work. –  Charles Bailey Oct 5 '12 at 6:39
2  
you shouldn't write the code for compilers, but for the people to read –  BЈовић Oct 5 '12 at 6:39
    
@iammlind: i removed the redundant (d). happily not yet referenced in any answer. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Oct 5 '12 at 6:40
1  
@BoPersson: Personally, I wouldn't want a side-by-side diff split across a monitor join. Having long lines means a lot of left-right scanning for my eyes. Keeping shorter lines and shorter identifiers is less tiring, aids comprehension and reduces the potential for mistakes. It is absolutely not obfuscating code. –  Charles Bailey Oct 5 '12 at 11:37

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Variant e ?

namespace loggingapi {
    namespace attributes {
        class Baz; // forward declare Baz.
    }

    class Biz {
        typedef attributes::Baz Baz;
        // C++ 11 alternative
        // using Baz = attributes::Baz;

        int f(Baz* b);
    }
} // namespaces

Do not forget what aliasing can do for you...

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Maybe aliasing is the way to go ? It would allow to fully qualified a type and create an alias and then use the alias instead. Is there any drawback using aliasing in a header for a Public API or Inheritance purposes ? –  David Andreoletti Oct 7 '12 at 12:05
    
@DavidAndreoletti: Well, it means creating one more symbol that may clash in the context where you alias. In a namespace, which is an unbounded context has it may be reopened as often as necessary, it could potentially be an issue; however in a class (like here), which is closed, then there is no penalty. –  Matthieu M. Oct 7 '12 at 12:26

I would go with the b) variant. My reasons are as follows:

  • We assume that the developer knows in what namespace he is now. So when looking at the class Biz, the developer should know that this class is in the loggingapi namespace, therefore, there's no need to explicitly state it.
  • The a) variant, on the other hand, isn't clear enough, because we should indicate that Baz and Biz are actually in different namespaces. Also, it is not going compile, because the compiler will look for Baz in the loggingapi namespace, and it isn't there.
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You should choose (b). It's more flexible. If you decide to move or (gasp) cut and paste f and it's related types to a new namespace or project then using (b) ensures that the structure of the declarations remains internally consistent.

You can choose to add, remove or rename outer wrapping namespaces without affecting the enclosed code.

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In h-file it is better to use fully qualified names, to prevent possible ambiguity in a client code. In .cpp file you can use short notation, if you prefer this, as long as there is no name clash.

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If a compiler has some ambiguity it will definitely report an error.

I believe the question should be with respect to the human reader, which is quite subjective.
The naming convention depends on

  1. Pre-decided coding style
  2. Where you are declaring the function f()

There is no clear choice over another. I would prefer that, if both entities are belonging to same namespace then I will omit at least that part from the name:

namespace loggingapi {
    namespace attributes {
        class Baz; // forward declare Baz.
    }

    class Biz {
        int f(attribute::Baz* b);
    };      // ^^^^^^^^^^^^^
}
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