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This is a two part question. Is it ok to assign the return value of a function to a reference? Such as

Foo FuncBar()
{
    return Foo();
}

// some where else
Foo &myFoo = FuncBar();

Is this ok? Its my understanding that FuncBar() returns a Foo object and now myFoo is a reference to it.

Second part of the question. Is this an optimization? So if your doing it in a loop a lot of the time is it better to do

Foo &myFoo = FuncBar();

or

Foo myFoo = FuncBar();

And take into account the variables use, won't using the ref require slower dereferences?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted
Foo &myFoo = FuncBar();

Will not compile. it should be:

const Foo &myFoo = FuncBar();

because FuncBar() returns a temporary object (i.e., rvalue) and only lvalues can be bound to references to non-const.

Is it safe?

Yes it is safe.

C++ standard specifies that binding a temporary object to a reference to const lengthens the lifetime of the temporary to the lifetime of the reference itself, and thus avoids what would otherwise be a common dangling-reference error.


Foo myFoo = FuncBar();      

Is Copy Initialization.
It creates a copy of the object returned by FuncBar() and then uses that copy to initalize myFoo. myFoo is an separate object after the statement is executed.

const Foo &myFoo = FuncBar();

Binds the temporary returned by FuncBar() to the reference myFoo, note that myFoo is just an alias to the returned temporary and not a separate object.

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3  
@Cheersandhth.-Alf: As per standard it should not.With compiler extensions, it might. –  Alok Save Oct 5 '12 at 7:16
3  
@Cheersandhth.-Alf Whereas I understand that somebody could define it to std::string*const& or whatever rubbish, I guess it is safe to assume typedefs are out of the question here. No, don't say it, I know assumptions are evil. But Ok, "should not compile according to the standard" or something the like would indeed have been better. –  Christian Rau Oct 5 '12 at 7:23
5  
@Cheersandhth.-Alf: You are being unduly rude.You can downvote if you feel the answer is incorrect. Your rudeness is not really appreciated nor is welcome. –  Alok Save Oct 5 '12 at 7:36
4  
@Alf Could you explain your point more in detail, because I'm not really following you. The only cases I can think of off hand where Foo& myFoo = fooBar(); would be legal are 1) if Foo is in fact a typedef to a const, or 2) Foo contains an operator Foo&(). Neither case would seem to be the "general" case. If I provide an empty definition of class Foo, the given code doesn't compile with g++, and gives the warning "nonstandard extension used" with VC++. –  James Kanze Oct 5 '12 at 8:04
1  
@Alf Yes. Even Foo& myFoo = fooBar(); is justified in cases where fooBar returns a reference; it's not unusual to initialize a reference with something like std::map<>::operator[], for example. I was speaking strictly about the case where fooBar returns an object. –  James Kanze Oct 5 '12 at 9:55

You're not "assigning" to a reference, you're binding to a reference.

That's only proper when the type is const and the context is one where there is automatic lifetime extension of the temporary.

In general, when Foo isn't a const type your examples should fail to compile. Unfortunately, they may compile with one common compiler, due to language extensions implemented by that compiler. It is a good idea to try out examples (and also ordinary code!) with at least two compilers.


EDIT: as an example of investigative work before posting a question, you should have compiled the following (or very similar) with highest warning level with at least two compilers, with and without CONST defined.

struct Bar {};

#ifdef CONST
    typedef Bar const Foo;
#else
    typedef Bar Foo;
#endif

Foo FuncBar()
{
    return Foo();
}

int main()
{
    // som where else
    Foo &myFoo = FuncBar();
}

If you haven't already done so, it can be a good idea to do that now.

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Are you talking about Visual Studio? Cause that's what I'm using and it's letting me do it. –  EddieV223 Oct 5 '12 at 7:08
    
@EddieV223: I'm talking about Microsoft's C++ compiler, which is used by Visual Studio. However, it does warn you. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Oct 5 '12 at 7:09
    
VS2012 express doesn't warn me. –  EddieV223 Oct 5 '12 at 7:10
2  
You need to up the warning level to /W4. Always do that. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Oct 5 '12 at 7:13

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