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public static int multiply2(int num1, int num2) {
    if (num1 == 0 || num2 == 0) {
        return 0;
    }

    else {
        return num1 + multiply2(num1, num2 - 1);
    }

}

I just realized that it would be fun to make a program that could determine the product of two numbers, one or both being negative. I want to do it using recursive multiplication (basically repeated addition). Could some one help me out? Thanks!

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So what's your question? –  Baz Oct 5 '12 at 7:07
    
@Baz : one or both being negative. –  Nandkumar Tekale Oct 5 '12 at 7:07
    
@NandkumarTekale I see, my bad. –  Baz Oct 5 '12 at 7:08
    
i've tried setting more params in the if statement, i want to know what area of my program is causing the trouble because i used the program above as is and it gave me the first number just fine but i had 6 method calls of multiply2. The other five calls returned a stackOverflow error. –  dydx Oct 5 '12 at 7:09
    
wow, such a firestorm of answers :D –  dydx Oct 5 '12 at 7:22

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted
if (num1 == 0 || num2 == 0) {
        return 0;
}

else if( num2 < 0 ) {
    return - num1 + multiply2(num1, num2 + 1);
}

else {
    return num1 + multiply2(num1, num2 - 1);
}
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else if (num1 < 0 || num2 < 0) {
    int signum1 = num1 < 0 ? -1 : 1;
    int signum2 = num2 < 0 ? -1 : 1;
    return signum1 * signum2 * multiply(signum1 * num1, signum2 * num2);
} else {

Something like that

Note: there is a signum function and Math.abs can be used for signum * num

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You would test if it's negative and subtract instead of add:

public static int multiply2(int num1, int num2) {
    if (num1 == 0 || num2 == 0) {
        return 0;
    }
    else if(num2 > 0){
        return num1 + multiply2(num1, num2 - 1);
    }
    else{
        return -num1 + multiply2(num1, num2 + 1);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't seem to work. It just hangs. –  David Wallace Oct 5 '12 at 7:13
    
Durp, I put 2 instead of 1 in the num2 > part. Should work now. –  CrazyCasta Oct 5 '12 at 7:14
    
Sorry, it's still wrong if num2 is negative. –  David Wallace Oct 5 '12 at 7:15
    
so in num1 x num2 is num2 is zero, output num1 that doesn't seem right.... 0*1=0 –  Pureferret Oct 5 '12 at 7:16
    
And one more fix, your base condition was right to start with :P –  CrazyCasta Oct 5 '12 at 7:17

You will need to add if number is -ve. If you see we are adding only first number and for second number condition we have to reach is 0. So if negative do+1 if positive do -1

        else if (num2 < 0)
            return -num1 + multiply2(num1, num2 + 1);
         else
            return num1 + multiply2(num1, num2 - 1);

    System.out.println(multiply2(5, -6));-->-30
    System.out.println(multiply2(5, 6));-->30
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't give the correct answer if num2 is negative. –  David Wallace Oct 5 '12 at 7:14
    
@DavidWallace It works properly. I have updated the result. Reason it works is only first number is being added and loop terminates on 0 –  Amit Deshpande Oct 5 '12 at 7:19
    
It does NOT work properly. You have demonstrated that it gives 30 as the result for 5 x -6. But 5 x -6 is NOT 30. –  David Wallace Oct 5 '12 at 7:22
    
@DavidWallace Yup. A dumb mistake. Thanks anyways. –  Amit Deshpande Oct 5 '12 at 7:29
    
OK, I see you have now corrected it! –  David Wallace Oct 5 '12 at 7:35
public static int multiply2(int num1, int num2) {
    if (num1 == 0 || num2 == 0) {
        return 0;
    }

    else {
        int sign2=(int)(Math.abs(num2)/num2);
        return sign2*num1 + multiply2(num1,num2-sign2);
    }

}
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David Wallace's answer is good but if the input is (1,124) or (-1,124) the depth of recursion (number of times the method calls itself) will be 123, not very efficient. I would suggest adding a couple of lines to test for 1 or -1. Here's a full example:

public class Multiply {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        System.out.print("product = " + multiply(1, 124) );
    }

    public static int multiply(int x, int y) {
        System.out.println("Multiply called: x = " + x + ", y = " + y);

        if (x == 0 || y == 0) {
            System.out.println("Zero case: x = " + x + ", y = " + y);
            return 0;
        }

        else if (x == 1 && y > 0) {
            return y;
        }

        else if (y == 1 && x > 0) {
            return x;
        }

        else if ( x == -1 && y > 0) {
            return -y;
        }

        else if ( y == -1 && x > 0) {
            return -x;
        }

        else if( y == -1 ) {
            System.out.println("y is == -1");
            return -x;
        }

        else if( x == -1 ) {
            System.out.println("x is == -1");
            return -y;
        }

        else if( y < 0 ) {
            System.out.println("y is < 0");
            return -x + multiply(x, y + 1);
        }

        else { 
            System.out.println("Last case: x = " + x + ", y = " + y);
            return x + multiply(x, y - 1);
        }
    }
}

Output:

Multiply called: x = 1, y = 124
product = 124
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Okay, so I am actually working on this one for homework. Recursive solutions implement - or use - a base case against which the need to continue is determined. Now, you might say, "What on Earth does that mean?" Well, in laymen's terms, it means we can simplify our code (and, in the real world, save our software some overhead) - about which I will explain, later. Now, a part of the issue is understanding some basic math, namely, a negative plus a negative is a negative or minus a positive ( -1 + -1 = -2) depending upon the math teacher to whom you speak (we'll see that come into play in the code, below).

Now, there is some debate to be had, here. About which I will write, later.

Here is my code:

public static int multiply(int a, int b)
{
    if (a == 0) 
    {
        return result;
    } 
    else if (a < 0) // Here, we only test to see whether the first param.  
                    // is a negative
    {
        return -b + multiply(a + 1, b); // Here, remember, neg. + neg. is a neg.
    }                                   // so we force b to be negative.
    else 
    {
        result = result + b;
        return multiply(Math.abs(a - 1), b);
    }
}

Notice there are a two things done differently, here:

  1. The code above does not test the second parameter to see whether the second parameter is negative (a < 0) because of the mathematical principle in the first paragraph (see bold text in first paragraph). Essentially, if I know I am multiplying (y) by a negative number (-n), I know I am taking -n and adding it together y number of times; therefore, if the multiplicand or multiplier is negative, I know I can take either of the numbers, make the number negative, and add the number to itself over and over again, e.g. -3 * 7 could be written (-3) + (-3) + (-3) + (-3)... etc. OR (-7) + (-7) + (-7)

  2. NOW HERE IS WHAT'S UP FOR DEBATE: That above code does not test to see whether the second number (int b) is 0, i.e. multiplying by 0. Why? Well, that's personal choice (sort of). The debate here must weigh the relative significance of something: the overhead for each choice (of either running an equals-zero test or not). If we do test to see if one side is zero, each time the recursive call to multiply is made, the code must evaluate the expression; however, if we do not test for equals zero, then the code adds a bunch of zeros together n number of times. In reality, both methods "weigh" the same - so, to save memory, I leave out the code.

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