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I'm trying to develop an application to communicate two computer through the serial port with pyserial.

The basic idea is to send several commands in both directions.

Computer A ---- INI ----> Computer B
Computer A <--- OKINI --- Computer B
Computer A ---- OK -----> Computer B

The code for the Computer A is:

s = serial.Serial(port='/dev/ttyUSB0', baudrate=19200, bytesize=8, parity='N', stopbits=1, timeout=None, xonxoff=0, rtscts=0)
s.flushOutput()
s.write("*INI,COMPUTER_A*")
s.flushInput()  
data = s.read(18)
if data:
    print data
    s.flushOutput()
    s.write("*OK,COMPUTER_A*")
s.close()

The code for the Computer B is:

s = serial.Serial(port='/dev/ttyUSB0', baudrate=19200, bytesize=8, parity='N', stopbits=1, timeout=None, xonxoff=0, rtscts=0)
s.flushInput()  
data = s.read(16)
if data:
    print data
    s.flushOutput()
    s.write("*OKINI,COMPUTER_B*")
    s.flushInput()
    data2 = s.read(15)
    if data2:
        print data2
s.close()

Both code works correctly sometimes. There are times when an execution outputs garbagge. I don't know what is the problem. What am I doing wrong for send and write from a serial port with PySerial?

Is it better for read and write in the serial port implement a threaded program listening and reading with a threads, one for listen and another for write?

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2 Answers 2

I think you're setting up race conditions with all your flushing. For example, flushing input just before a read would kill the incoming data if the other side started responding before you call read. You really don't need all these flushes around your reads and writes.

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But, why are there a lots of garbagge in the output when I read from the line? –  dseira Oct 8 '12 at 6:48

it seems like you're setting up for packet collisions, which is probably the source of the 'garbage' in your outputs.

you'll need to set up some sort of timing protocol, either by synchronizing a count on both computers, or by establishing burst communications, where each computer kicks out its messages then sniffs for packets.

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It is done. The problem was the number of character to read. Thanks to both. –  dseira Oct 19 '12 at 12:50
2  
@snake, it would be beneficial for all those that come after you with the same problem if you either accepted the most helpful answer or sit for 5 minutes to describe in what way "the number of characters read" was the problem and how you fixed it. –  Vorac Sep 11 '13 at 8:50

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