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I need to pass an unsigned char array from one method to another, and i tried using this code:

{
     unsigned char *lpBuffer = new unsigned char[182];
 ReceiveSystemState(lpBuffer);

}

BOOL ReceiveSystemState(unsigned char *lpBuffer)
  {
      unsigned char strRecvBuffer[182] = { 0 };
      //strRecvBuffer construction

      memcpy(lpBuffer, strRecvBuffer, sizeof(strRecvBuffer));

      return TRUE;
 }

Neither of those 3 methods (used in ReceiveSystemState) worked as i expected. After using each one of them all that it is copied is the first char from strRecvBuffer and nothing more. The strRecvBuffer has empty chars from element to element, but i need those as they are, because that string is a message from a hardware device and that message will be anallysed using a protocol. What do i miss here? Do i initialize lpBuffer wrong?

EDIT: I've used a simple memcpy method to do the job. Still the same result: all that it is copied is the first char of strRecvBuffer.

EDIT2: Working code:

{
     unsigned char *lpBuffer = new unsigned char[182];
     ReceiveSystemState(lpBuffer);
     for (int i = 0; i < 144; i++)
     {
         memcpy(&c_dateKG[i], lpBuffer + i * sizeof(unsigned char), sizeof(unsigned char) );
     }

}    
  BOOL ReceiveSystemState(unsigned char *lpBuffer)
  {
     unsigned char strRecvBuffer[182] = { 0 };
     //strRecvBuffer construction

     memcpy(lpBuffer, strRecvBuffer, sizeof(strRecvBuffer));

     return TRUE;
  }
share|improve this question
    
@Nobody...I don't think it will make a difference since unsigned char has 1 byte size. so basically 182 * sizeof(unsigned char) is same as 182. –  sgarizvi Oct 5 '12 at 7:47
    
I don't get this. Where should that data come from? You define strRecvBuffer to contain one 0 and garbage after that. Other than that, memcpy will copy all of the array, as will your loop. –  dbrank0 Oct 5 '12 at 7:47
1  
= { 0 } is the syntax to set all elements to 0 –  mtsvetkov Oct 5 '12 at 7:48
2  
memcpy( lpBuffer, strRecvBuffer, 182 ) should do the job. There's something else you're not showing us. Also: why do you cast to void sometimes, and not others? Why do you assign NULL to a variable which is immediately going out of scope, and why do you check for null before delete[] (where a null pointer is legal), and not earlier? For that matter, why do you check for null at all, since new[] is guaranteed never to return a null pointer? And perhaps most importantly: why are you using new[], instead of std::vector< unsigned char >? –  James Kanze Oct 5 '12 at 7:49
1  
@MRM regarding "a method that reads the data from a serial port, and returns strRecvBuffer." in the code above strRecvBuffer is a local variable, therefore we are to assume you are passing it to the unseen method? The code above is not the code from your source causing your issue. I've no doubt you have an issue, but in the process of trimming what you deemed unimportant code before posting it here, you trimmed the problem as well. Any doubts to that I suggest you create a stand alone file with just the code above and run that. provided both the dyn-alloc and static are 182 bytes. works. –  WhozCraig Oct 5 '12 at 9:24

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your code absolutely garbage. Some notes:

Use sizeof

Use sizeof(static_massive_name); or count_of_arr_elements * sizeof(arr_type); For example:

unsigned char src[255];    
unsigned char dst[255];

// fill src with random data
for (int i = 0; i < 255; ++i) {
    src[i] = static_cast<unsigned char> (rand() % 255);
}

memcpy(src, dst, sizeof(dst));


// now dst will have copyed values from src (random numbers)

UPDATE:

Full source code for testing:

#include <iostream>
#include <string.h>
#include <time.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

using namespace std;

void print(unsigned char* arr, size_t size) {
    for (size_t i = 0; i < size; ++i) { 
        // see type casting (to int)!!!
        cout << "arr[" << i << "] = " << (int)arr[i]<< endl;
    }
}

int main() {
    srand(time(0));

    // unsigned char type hold values from 0 to 255
    unsigned char src[15];
    unsigned char dst[15];

    for (int i = 0; i < 15; ++i) {
        src[i] = rand() % 255;
    }

    memcpy(src, dst, sizeof(dst));

    print(src, 15);
    print(dst, 15);

    return 0;
}

result

arr[0] = 34
arr[1] = 80
arr[2] = 183
arr[3] = 112
arr[4] = 18
arr[5] = 120
arr[6] = 183
arr[7] = 0
arr[8] = 0
arr[9] = 0
arr[10] = 0
arr[11] = 57
arr[12] = 137
arr[13] = 4
arr[14] = 8
arr[0] = 34
arr[1] = 80
arr[2] = 183
arr[3] = 112
arr[4] = 18
arr[5] = 120
arr[6] = 183
arr[7] = 0
arr[8] = 0
arr[9] = 0
arr[10] = 0
arr[11] = 57
arr[12] = 137
arr[13] = 4
arr[14] = 8
share|improve this answer
    
I've tried that also, the result is the same: only the first char is copied. –  MRM Oct 5 '12 at 8:17
    
your sample works just fine, applying the method to my code does not work. –  MRM Oct 5 '12 at 8:36
    
1. If my code works fine, than system memcpy works fine 2. When you print unsigned char - be sure to make cast to int (if your code use c++) or printf (for C code): unsigned char var = 12; printf("var is = %d\n", (int) var); –  Maxim Oct 5 '12 at 8:44
    
i am sure memcpy works fine, there is still something there, in my code that i do not use right. And it really makes no sense because i the syntax looks fine now. –  MRM Oct 5 '12 at 8:48
1  
The sample Code is wrong! "src" and "dst" in memcpy functions need to be swapped, correct: memcpy(dst, src, sizeof(src)); check the manual. The sample code given seems to work because the uninitialized "dst" also contains random charaters. For better testing, use i instead of rand() % 255 in the src initialisation loop. –  bhelm May 8 '13 at 6:19

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