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I am trying to use the following code in my application, it throws exception in french OS only. can you help me in solving this issue.

using System.Globalization;
using System.Threading;

....
CultureInfo pro = new CultureInfo(Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture.Name);
SqlCmd.Parameters[Dat.ColumnName].Value = Convert.ToDecimal("0.000001",pro);
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1  
What's the exception? –  Tim Croydon Oct 5 '12 at 7:41
1  
Why are you creating a new CultureInfo from the current CultureInfo? Then you could just use it. –  Tim Schmelter Oct 5 '12 at 7:43

3 Answers 3

That's not a valid decimal in French. In French the decimal sign is a comma.

If your string always has a period as decimal sign, it makes no sense to use the current culture. Better to use the invariant culture:

Convert.ToDecimal("0.000001", CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);

On a different note:

C# knows using directives, so you don't have to fully qualify all your types.

Instead of writing System.Globalization.CultureInfo, you can just put using System.Globalization; at the top of your C# file and use CultureInfo in your code.
That makes your code a lot more readable.

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+1 for the note on using directive. –  shahkalpesh Oct 5 '12 at 7:48
    
Hi Thank you for your reply, It works now in French language. my application is not language specific, Does the code work in all the other languages? –  Nethaji Oct 5 '12 at 8:11
    
As long as the string always uses a period as decimal sign, yes, it works in all languages. That's why it is called InvariantCulture :-) –  Daniel Hilgarth Oct 5 '12 at 8:30

In French Culture, decimals do not use dot, but comma. (ex : 0,000001)

If you want to parse 0.00001 in French culture, specify CultureInfo.InvariantCulture in order to handle the dot instead of the comma

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Thank you for your reply –  Nethaji Oct 5 '12 at 8:11
    
Hi Thank you for your reply, It works now in French language. my application is not language specific, Does the code work in all the other languages? –  Nethaji Oct 5 '12 at 8:12
1  
Yes, if you takes cares to specify the invariant culture everywhere you parse. Take care to also specify the CultureInfo.InvariantCulture when you call ToString() on a number, too ;) (in order to have a consistent print/parse culture) –  Nicolas Voron Oct 5 '12 at 8:24

It has to do with how the cultures specify decimal numbers. In english (and in .net's Invariant culture) the decimal separator is the dot character ".", but in french (and most european cultures), the comma "," is the decimal separator.

using System.Globalization;
...

decimal d = Convert.ToDecimal("0.000001",CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);
//outputs 0.000001
Console.WriteLine(d); 

CultureInfo french = new CultureInfo("fr");
d = Convert.ToDecimal("0,000001",french);
//outputs 0.000001
Console.WriteLine(d); 

d = Convert.ToDecimal("0.000001",french);
//Throws an "Input string was not in a correct format" exception
//because a . is not a valid character in a decimal, according to french culture

If you get the value from the user via the UI, you need to be extra careful what culture he's entering the data in, because it's easy to misinterpret a decimal point as a thousands separator, and instead of ten (10.00) items to save a thousand.

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Thank you for your reply –  Nethaji Oct 5 '12 at 8:08

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