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I have a templated class

template< std::size_t Size >
class Buffer
{
....
};

I'd like to prevent instantiation of this template when the Size argument is zero. i.e. generate a compiler warning for the following.

Buffer< 0 > buf;

but all other variants would work.

Buffer< 10 > buf;

I'm looking at using boost::enable_if_c but I don't understand how to get it working.

--Update-- I can't use any c++11 features, unfortunately

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5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Utilizing BOOST_STATIC_ASSERT might be even easier:

#include <boost/static_assert.hpp>

template< std::size_t Size >
class Buffer
{
    BOOST_STATIC_ASSERT(Size != 0);
};


int main()
{
    Buffer<0> b; //Won't compile
    return 0;
}
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+1 + Accepted : As my compiler doesn't support static_assert and I originally wanted a boost answer :) –  ScaryAardvark Oct 5 '12 at 8:26

Simply specialize the template to a state that cannot be instatiated:

template <>
class Buffer<0>;

That way the class cannot be constructed. Usage will result in: error: aggregate ‘Buffer<0> buf’ has incomplete type and cannot be defined

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There is no need to make constructor private. Making the class body-less, i.e.template<> class Buffer<0>; is sufficient to generate an error. –  iammilind Oct 5 '12 at 8:20
1  
@iammilind: Right, I forgot about the simple declaration without definition. Edited to the shorter version. –  Nobody Oct 5 '12 at 8:22

If your compiler support it, try static_assert:

template< std::size_t Size >
class Buffer
{
    static_assert(Size != 0, "Size must be non-zero");

    // ...
};
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+1 I agree that this would be the better approach if the compiler supports static_assert, however my compiler doesn't. –  ScaryAardvark Oct 5 '12 at 8:26
#include <stddef.h>

typedef ptrdiff_t Size;

template< Size size >
class Buffer
{
    static_assert( size > 0, "" );
};

int main()
{
#ifdef  ZERO
    Buffer<0>   buf;
#else
    Buffer<1>   buf;
#endif
}
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3  
This will fail Buffer<-1> also; which is not the requirement. –  iammilind Oct 5 '12 at 8:22
    
@iammilind: it the OP desires to support buffer size -1, then he will hopefully find it easy to change the condition from > to !=. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Oct 5 '12 at 8:29
1  
Yup, and interestingly the other way is to simply typdef unsigned long Size;, so all invocation except the Buffer<0> shall pass. –  iammilind Oct 5 '12 at 8:36
2  
"please explain your downvote, so that others can more easily ignore your future downvotes and comments" - Well, if he had explained it reasonably, there wouldn't be any reason to ignore his future downvotes and comments per se, apart from taking downvotes personally maybe. iammilind already gave some reason (not implying him or me to be the downvoter). –  Christian Rau Oct 5 '12 at 8:59
1  
It's especially difficult to take that notion seriously considering that the questioner uses size_t for the type of the template parameter. This is the "unsigned types? I hates them!" version of the questioner's code -- use a signed type but exclude negative values. Obviously the rest of the class might have to be updated to account for that, but since that isn't shown in the question, Alf can't demonstrate it. –  Steve Jessop Oct 5 '12 at 9:31

std::enable_if

template <std::size_t N, typename = typename std::enable_if<!!N>::type>
class Matrix {};

static_assert:

template <std::size_t N>
class Matrix
{
    static_assert(N, "Error: N is 0");
};
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