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I have two array definition and I want to do addition operation element by element without looping operation? for example:

decimal[] xx = { 1, 2, 3 };
decimal[] yy = { 6, 7, 8 };

the result I want is:

decimal[] zz = { 7, 9, 11 };

the addition operation is simple. Just add one by one for each element like

decimal[] zz = decimal[xx.Length];
for (int i=0; i<xx.Length;i++){
   zz[i] =xx[i] + yy[i];
}

But I don't want to use looping operation.

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3  
Why do you want to get rid of the loop? –  Rob Oct 5 '12 at 8:00
1  
Why do you perform addition 3 times per loop??? –  Suzan Cioc Oct 5 '12 at 8:11

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can't do that without looping some way or the other.

Your array creation and loop should be:

decimal[] zz = new decimal[xx.Length];
for (int i = 0; i < xx.Length; i++){
   zz[i] = xx[i] + yy[i];
}

Or a more compact, but somewhat less readable version:

decimal[] zz = new decimal[xx.Length];
for (int i = 0; i < xx.Length; zz[i++] = xx[i] + yy[i]);

You can also use Linq extensions to do the looping:

decimal[] zz = xx.Select((x, i) => x + yy[i]).ToArray();

Or:

decimal[] zz = Enumerable.Range(0, xx.Length).Select(i => xx[i]+yy[i]).ToArray();
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You can use Enumerable.Zip:

decimal[] zz = xx.Zip(yy, (x, y) => x + y).ToArray();
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1  
doesn't work on .net3.5 –  Habibillah Oct 5 '12 at 8:09
1  
...but it's trivial to write a replacement for .Zip in .net 3.5: blackwasp.co.uk/LinqZip35.aspx –  spender Oct 5 '12 at 8:26
  var zz = xx.Select((x, i) => x + yy[i]).ToArray();
share|improve this answer
    
+1, clever way to use Select –  Cuong Le Oct 5 '12 at 8:34
    
Will result in an IndexOutOfRangeException if xx is greater than yy. –  Tim Schmelter Oct 5 '12 at 9:39
1  
@TimSchmelter And Zip will sliently ignore it. Is it better? –  L.B Oct 5 '12 at 10:29
    
Depends. I just wanted to comment it. It might be an option to use ElementAtOrDefault instead of the indexer here. Then this approach would even have an additional advantage over Enumerable.Zip. –  Tim Schmelter Oct 5 '12 at 11:01

Another way using Enumerable.Range beside Zip:

var result = Enumerable.Range(0, xx.Length)
                       .Select(i => xx[i] + yy[i])
                       .ToArray();
share|improve this answer
    
    
@Rawling: sorry I don't get your point –  Cuong Le Oct 5 '12 at 8:17
    
This code will return an array with one less element than xx has. –  Rawling Oct 5 '12 at 8:18
1  
@Rawling: thanks I got it –  Cuong Le Oct 5 '12 at 8:32
    
Will result in an IndexOutOfRangeException if xx is greater than yy. –  Tim Schmelter Oct 5 '12 at 9:37

You can use LINQ:

var zz = Enumerable
             .Range(0, (int)Math.Min(xx.Length, yy.Length))
             .Select(i => xx[i] + yy[i])
             .ToArray();

but that's really just moving the looping behind-the-scenes.

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This is the best way for .NET 3.5, since Enumerable.Zip requires .NET 4.0. –  Paolo Moretti Oct 5 '12 at 8:15
    
Will result in an IndexOutOfRangeException if xx is greater than yy. –  Tim Schmelter Oct 5 '12 at 9:39
    
Cheers Tim, fixed. –  Rawling Oct 5 '12 at 9:43

If they are globally scoped arrays you could use recursion

public void add(int index){

  zz[index] = xx[index] + yy[index];

  if(index < xx.Length){
     add(index+1);

   }

}

Is psuedo-code, untested, but represents general idea. Let me know your thoughts.

share|improve this answer
    
As this is the only answer thus far that doesn't use a loop, I don't think it's worth a -1 :p –  Rawling Oct 5 '12 at 8:05
    
Thank you! I make no guarantee as to its optimality, but hope it satisfies the brief! –  ComethTheNerd Oct 5 '12 at 8:07

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