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I´ve got the following classes:

public class Person
{
}

public class Employee : Person
{
}

public class Customer : Person
{
}

Some methods that use these classes:

public class OtherClass
{
    public void DoSomething(Employee e)
    {
    }

    public void DoSomething(Customer c)
    {
    }
}

The call:

// People = Collection<Person>.
foreach (var p in People)
    DoSomething(p); // Should call the right method at runtime and "see" if it´s an Employee or a Customer.

The compiler does not allow this. How do I implement this scenario?

share|improve this question
    
And your question is? –  Daniel Oct 5 '12 at 8:35
    
How to do that because it doesn´t work! –  timmkrause Oct 5 '12 at 8:36
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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The easiest approach here is polymorphism, i.e.

public class Person
{
    public virtual void DoSomething() {} // perhaps abstract?
}

public class Employee : Person
{
    public override void DoSomething() {...}
}

public class Customer : Person
{
    public override void DoSomething() {...}
}

and use:

foreach (var p in People)
    p.DoSomething();

HOWEVER! If that isn't possible, then cheat:

foreach (var p in People)
    DoSomething((dynamic)p); // TADA!

Another option would be to check the type yourself:

public void DoSomething(Person p)
{
    Employee e = p as Employee;
    if(e != null) DoSomething(e);
    else {
        Customer c = p as Customer;
        if(c != null) DoSomething(c);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry I missed that. DoSomething() is not part of the base class. It´s a member of another external class. –  timmkrause Oct 5 '12 at 8:39
    
@tkrause k, then the 1st option might be possible; the 2nd/3rd options should work fine, though –  Marc Gravell Oct 5 '12 at 8:39
    
Type checking is what we DO NOT want. Because every time you create new types you have to touch that code again. We thought it should work without it. –  timmkrause Oct 5 '12 at 8:41
    
The cast to dynamic does not work either. :( –  timmkrause Oct 5 '12 at 8:43
    
@tkrause why should it? in pretty much every type-based language I can think of, that wouldn't compile in the way you intend - why would it be different for C#? However: did you try the dynamic option, which forces the system to do exactly what you have asked? –  Marc Gravell Oct 5 '12 at 8:44
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