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Suppose I have a base class and two classes derived from it:

class Base
{
protected:
    double value;
public:
    virtual ~Base();

    Base(double value) : value(value) {}
    Base(const Base& B) { value=B.value; }

    Base operator+ (const Base& B) const { 
        return Base(value+B.value); 
    }

};

class final Derived1 : public Base {
public:
    Derived1(double value) : Base(value) {}
};

class final Derived2 : public Base {
public:
    Derived2(double value) : Base(value) {}
};

I want to accomplish the following:

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    Derived1 a = Derived1(4.0);
    Derived2 b = Derived2(3.0);

    a+a; // this should return a Derived1 object
    b+b; // this should return a Derived2 object

    a+b; // this should FAIL AT COMPILE TIME

    return 0;
}

In other words, I want to guarantee that the inherited operator+ only operates on objects of the same type as the calling instance.

How do I do this cleanly? I found myself re-defining the operator for each class:

class final Derived1 : public Base {
    ...
    Derived1 operator+ (const Derived1& D1) const {
        return Derived1(value+D1.value);
    }
    ...
};

class final Derived2 : public Base {
    ...            
    Derived2 operator+ (const Derived2& D1) const {
        return Derived2(value+D1.value);
    }
    ...
};

But that's just a pain. Moreover, it doesn't seem like proper code re-use to me.

What is the proper technique to use here?

share|improve this question
    
If you want this, don't put an operator+ on the base. (Also, shouldn't the base have a virtual destructor?) –  R. Martinho Fernandes Oct 5 '12 at 8:52
    
@R.MartinhoFernandes: You're saying I have to re-define the operator+ for each derived class? But the definition is exactly the same, except for the type. There really is no way to save code here? –  Rody Oldenhuis Oct 5 '12 at 8:53
    
"exactly the same, except for the type" is not "exactly the same". But yeah, there's a way to save code. I'll post an answer. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Oct 5 '12 at 8:54
    
But there's a big problem that you seem to not be considering here: what if I add class Derived3 : public Derived1? Should Derived3 d3; Derived1 d1; d1+d3; compile? If yes, what semantics should it have? If no, then you're out of luck. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Oct 5 '12 at 8:56
    
Downvoter care to comment? –  Rody Oldenhuis Oct 5 '12 at 9:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you can make sure Derived1 and Derived2 are leaf classes (i.e. no other class can derive from them) you can do this with the curiously recurring template pattern:

template <typename T>
class BaseWithAddition : public Base {
    T operator+(T const& rhs) const {
        return T(value + rhs.value);
    }
};

class final Derived1 : public BaseWithAddition<Derived1> {
    // blah blah
};

class final Derived2 : public BaseWithAddition<Derived2> {
    // blah blah
};

(final is a C++11 feature that prevents further derivation.)

If you allow derivation from Derived1 and Derived2 then you get trouble:

class Derived3 : public Derived1 {};
Derived3 d3;
Derived1 d1;
Derived1& d3_disguised = d3;
d1 + d3_disguised; // oooops, this is allowed

There's no way to prevent this at compile-time. And even if you want to allow it, it's not easy to get decent semantics for this operation without multiple dispatch.

share|improve this answer
    
+1: yup, that was going to be my reply to your comment; the derived classes are final. Quick test showed that this works, but let me read up on this pattern first. –  Rody Oldenhuis Oct 5 '12 at 9:04
    
So right off: would this be advisable? Is this considered good practice? –  Rody Oldenhuis Oct 5 '12 at 9:06
    
@RodyOldenhuis Yes, this is pretty healthy :) It is not a "hack" or anything. CRTP is one of the most used template idioms. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Oct 5 '12 at 9:11
    
Well I learned something today. Thanks! BTW, what do you consider the best source for learning these patterns? –  Rody Oldenhuis Oct 5 '12 at 9:22
    
@Rody I learned this one from the book C++ Templates: The Complete Guide. There's a wikibook titled "More C++ Idioms" that includes lots and lots of idioms, but I've seen some that are either very specific or not really recommendable. Since I haven't read them all, I can't vouch for it, but it may be worth a look if you keep a skeptical eye. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Oct 5 '12 at 9:30

You can use specialized template function to add values. Unfortunately this trick does not work with operators: It fails if types are not the same, and returns proper type:

#include <type_traits>
class Base;
template <class Derived>
Derived add(const Derived& l, const Derived& r, 
            typename std::enable_if<std::is_base_of<Base,Derived>::value>::type* = NULL);


class Base
{
 ...
    template <class Derived>
    friend Derived add(const Derived& l, const Derived& r, 
       typename std::enable_if<std::is_base_of<Base,Derived>::value>::type* = NULL);
};

template <class Derived>
Derived add(const Derived& l, const Derived& r, 
 typename std::enable_if<std::is_base_of<Base,Derived>::value>::type* = NULL) 
{ 
    return l.value + r.value; 
}

And the proof it works:

int main() {
   int a = 0;
   a = a + a;
   Derived1 d11(0), d12(0);
   Derived2 d21(0), d22(0);
   add(d11, d12);
   add(d21, d22);
   add(d12, d22); // here it fails to compile...
}    
share|improve this answer
    
+1: Nice, but operator+ is now a free function. This means that if I have two more classes Base2 and Base3, addition of instances of these will fail even though addition should work on those classes; an encapsulation problem that's better handled by @R.MartinhoFernandes' solution. –  Rody Oldenhuis Oct 5 '12 at 9:50
1  
A problem with this solution is that you have blanketed operator+. You have defined it for all classes, but it is only useful for a few of them. –  Gorpik Oct 5 '12 at 9:52
    
@Rody I added static_assert, but still think for better solution. BTW, this template operator + won't be selected for types (like int) where non template operator + exist. –  PiotrNycz Oct 5 '12 at 14:04
    
@Rody I changed my answer - I know it is not exactly what you want - it is function, not operator - but it met all others requirements –  PiotrNycz Oct 5 '12 at 15:46

As long as value is defined only in the base class, and the operation doesn't need to access any derived members, you might be able to get away with only defining the base operator and letting implicit type casting handle the rest. As for errors with different types, it might be worth a small sacrifice to use an enum-based system to track the types, and then do a simple comparison to check for invalid conditions.

enum eTypeEnum {BASE, DER1, DER2};

class Base {
public:
  virtual ~Base(){}

  Base(double value) : eType(BASE),value(value) {}
  Base(const Base& B) { value=B.value; }

  Base operator+ (const Base& B) const {
    if (eType != B.eType) return -1; //error condition
    return Base(value+B.value);
  }
  double getVal(){return value;}
protected:
  eTypeEnum eType;
  double value;
};

class Derived1 : public Base {
public:
  Derived1(double value) : Base(value) {eType = DER1;}
};

class Derived2 : public Base {
public:
  Derived2(double value) : Base(value) {eType = DER2;}
};


int main() {
  int tmp;
  Derived1 a(4.0);
  Derived2 b(3.0);
  Base c(2.0);

  cout << "aa:" << (a+a).getVal();     // 8
  cout << "\nbb:" << (b+b).getVal();   // 6
  cout << "\nba:" << (b+a).getVal();   // 7
  cout << "\nab:"<< (a+b).getVal();    // 7

  cout << "\ncc:"<< (c+c).getVal();    // 4
  cout << "\nac:"<< (a+c).getVal();    // 6
  cout << "\nbc:" << (b+c).getVal();   // 5
  cout << "\nabc:" << (a+b+c).getVal();// 9
  cout << endl;
  cin >> tmp;
  return 0;
}

Outputs: aa:8 bb:6 ba:-1 ab:-1 cc:4 ac:-1 bc:-1 abc:1

The only issue I see is that when chaining multiple operations together, the casting screws up the handling. Here, a+b+c 432 evaluates as (a+b)+c so the a+b bit experiences the error condition (returning -1), but gets cast as a Base which lets (-1)+c return '1'.

share|improve this answer
1  
But I want addition of unequal types to fail; this compiles just fine... –  Rody Oldenhuis Oct 5 '12 at 9:20
    
Oh, missed that part. I've updated my post to reflect the addition of a type-tracking enum system that allows the base operator to verify that the arguments are correct. One vulnerability is that clients can spoof their type in their constructors, and the enum needs to be updated as new classes are added, but it's probably the lightest code you can do without using RTTI. –  Ghost2 Oct 5 '12 at 9:49
1  
Hmmm...the -1 you are returning is implicitly cast to Base, which is no longer possible once you make Base's constructor private (which I have). Moreover, it's still not a compile time error, plus there are the weaknesses that you already indicated. Sorry, I'm downvoting this one. –  Rody Oldenhuis Oct 5 '12 at 9:56

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