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What's the best practice of using subqueries versus calculations multiple times? I've used subqueries until now, but they seem so ridiculous to have when you just need a variable calculated from the previous query (in the following example we're talking about a query with a subquery with a subquery).

So which is the right / best practice method? Personally, being a programmer, everything in me tells me to use method a, seeing as it seems stupid to copy paste calculations, but at the same time, subqueries aren't always good seeing as it can make the query use filesort instead of index sorts (correct me if I'm wrong in this, please).

Method a - subqueries:

SELECT
    tmp2.*
FROM
    (
        SELECT
            tmp.*,
            (NOW() < tmp.expire_time) as `active`
        FROM
            (
                SELECT
                    tr.orderid,
                    tr.transactiontime,
                    pa.months as `months`,
                    DATE_ADD(tr.transactiontime, INTERVAL pa.months MONTH) as `expire_time`
                FROM
                    `transactions` as `tr`
                INNER JOIN
                    `packages` as `pa`
                ON
                    tr.productid = pa.productid
                WHERE
                    tr.isprocessed = '1'
                ORDER BY
                    tr.transactiontime ASC
            ) as `tmp`
    ) as `tmp2`
WHERE
    tmp2.active = 1

Explain:

subqueries

Method b - reusing calculations:

SELECT
    tr.orderid,
    tr.transactiontime,
    pa.months as `months`,
    DATE_ADD(tr.transactiontime, INTERVAL pa.months MONTH) as `expire_time`,
    (NOW() < DATE_ADD(tr.transactiontime, INTERVAL pa.months MONTH)) as `active`
FROM
    `transactions` as `tr`
INNER JOIN
    `packages` as `pa`
ON
    tr.productid = pa.productid
WHERE
    tr.isprocessed = '1'
AND
    (NOW() < DATE_ADD(tr.transactiontime, INTERVAL pa.months MONTH))
ORDER BY
    tr.transactiontime ASC

Explain: enter image description here

Notice how DATE_ADD(tr.transactiontime, INTERVAL pa.months MONTH) is repeated 3 times, and (NOW() < DATE_ADD(tr.transactiontime, INTERVAL pa.months MONTH)) is repeated 2 times.

With the EXPLAINs it seems that method B is much better, but I still dislike the fact that it has to do the same calculation 3 times (I'm assuming it does this, and doesn't save the result and replace all instances itself.).

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1 Answer 1

You should look at MySQL's EXPLAIN command:

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/explain.html

which tells you how MySQL executes the queries.

share|improve this answer
    
EXPLAINs added to the OP - but this still doesn't repond to my question whether this is really the best ways to do this (this is a simplified query, and there could be 100 repeated calculations in a very advanced query) –  h2ooooooo Oct 5 '12 at 10:36
    
You can do it both way, but the effective one would be doing less operations. it's like any language. You may say "I'm going to the place where they sell apples, oranges, bananas.." or "I'm going to the store where they sell fruits", or you can say "I'm going to the grocery". They still would be correct. B is correct because querying a subquery is slower than a math operation. –  Taha Paksu Oct 5 '12 at 13:17

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