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Objective-C: Class vs Instance Methods?

Why we put '+' or '-' sign in front of method name in iOS. Please help me on sign logic and what's the difference in that ?

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marked as duplicate by H2CO3, Praveen, Toon Krijthe, Janak Nirmal, Martin R Oct 5 '12 at 10:57

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
yes, but for confirmation and more explanation, i thought to ask. –  Pradeep Singhvi Oct 5 '12 at 10:11
    
No problem, its good to ask for more specification. –  user1573321 Oct 5 '12 at 10:12

5 Answers 5

It has nothing to do with signs;

+ means the method is a class method, that is, it operates on (or, rather, its scope is) the class itself, not instances. The corresponding thing in many other languages is static.

- means the method is an instance method, that is, it operates on instances of the class.

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thanks to all friends :) –  Pradeep Singhvi Oct 5 '12 at 10:06
`@interface MyClass : NSObject
{
}

+(id) someMethod;  // declaration of class method

-(id) someMethod;  // declaration of instance method

@end` 

Instance methods apply on instances of classes, so they need an object to be applied on and can access their caller's members.

On the other hand class methods apply on the whole class, they don't rely on any object.

check this link for proper knowledge link

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A minus - sign denotes an instance method. A plus + sign is a class method.

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The leading + sign denotes a class method, the - sign means an instance method.

Side note: this should not be asked here - read that tutorial more carefully.

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The - prefix denotes an instance method, and the + prefix denotes a class (or static) method.

See this (and many other) SO posts for more information.

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