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I’m currently trying to have an attractive form part of which includes a keygen tag. This works well, but when I try to apply the same CSS I’m using for the “text” fields to the keygen tag I get a less than optimal effect. Is there a quick reference as to what styles work with the keygen field and which don’t?

UPDATE

Sorry I wasn't in front of my development machine earlyer and unable to provide a screenshot, now I am...

Current screenshot is 1

Current CSS (fragment) reads

            form#setup textarea {
            background: #ffffff;
            border: none;
            -moz-border-radius: 3px;
            -webkit-border-radius: 3px;
            -khtml-border-radius: 3px;
            border-radius: 3px;
            font: italic 26px Georgia, "Times New Roman", Times, serif;
            outline: none;
            padding: 5px;
            width: 450px;
            }
        form#setup keygen {
            background: #ffffff;
            border: none;
            -moz-border-radius: 3px;
            -webkit-border-radius: 3px;
            -khtml-border-radius: 3px;
            border-radius: 3px;
            font: italic 26px Georgia, "Times New Roman", Times, serif;
            outline: none;
            padding: 5px;
            width: 450px;
            }

Where setup is the id of the form. (I'm planning on increasing the font size of the label's to match the text entry boxes BTW)

UPDATE2 here is a jsfiddle link http://jsfiddle.net/uAsJN/

share|improve this question
    
I don't know a quick reference and the spec does not say anything about this. But if you provided us with an example, I could help make it petty. – Allan Kimmer Jensen Oct 5 '12 at 11:25
    
Can you post an example of "less than optimal", and what styles ar4e you trying to apply? Best would be a link... – Marius Stuparu Oct 5 '12 at 11:29
    
Could you make a testcase on jsfiddle.net? – Madara Uchiha Oct 5 '12 at 18:39
    
Done sorry for the delay, I was away from my development machine when I posted the question. – S Herbert Oct 5 '12 at 18:39
    
P.S. The screen shot is from Chrome, The same issue is present in firefox, IE and Safire have slightly different interfaces (due to their implementation of the keygen tag) not tested in Opera. – S Herbert Oct 5 '12 at 18:41
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Hope this can help you a bit!

Styling <keygen>

Should be easy, right? Maybe not as easy as you would think.

In Firefox, the <keygen> element is replaced by a <select _moz-type="-mozilla-keygen">. Therefore, to style it, you should use the select[_moz-type="-mozilla-keygen"] selector.

In Chrome, the <keygen> element stays, but implicitly contains a <select>. You can style it by using the keygen::-webkit-keygen-select selector. However, since you should style <keygen> as if it were a single <select> just in case the behaviour changes in the future, you will need to remove the style on webkit only for a consistent interface.

This can be achieved by wrapping the webkit only selectors in @media screen and (-webkit-min-device-pixel-ratio:0); if this confuses you, checkout the stylesheet on GitHub.

Source: http://keygen.alexchamberlain.co.uk/

Git Source: https://github.com/alexchamberlain/keygen

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks that work's perfectly. – S Herbert Oct 7 '12 at 17:14

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