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I am making a static library, everything defined in it is all in one namespace. But I am unsure whether I should define the methods as if you would a class, or also wrap them in the namespace. What I'm asking is:

Is this valid:

MyThings.h

namespace MyThings {
    void DoStuff();
    void DoOtherStuff();
}

MyThings.cpp

namespace MyThings {
    void DoStuff() {
        // Do this.
    }

    void DoOtherStuff() {
        // Do that.
    }
}

Or, should I define it like I would class methods?:

MyThings.cpp

void MyThings::DoStuff() {
    // Do this.
}

void MyThings::DoOtherStuff() {
    // Do that.
}

I would prefer not to use using namespace MyThings;, and I would prefer to use my first example if it is valid, I feel it makes the code more readable without having to use MyThings:: before every method identifier.

share|improve this question
2  
Both are valid. –  Alok Save Oct 5 '12 at 10:19
    
Both variants works equally well. It's up to you how you want it. –  Joachim Pileborg Oct 5 '12 at 10:19
1  
Related (and offers discussion of the third option): stackoverflow.com/questions/10928686/… –  Steve Jessop Oct 5 '12 at 10:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Both are valid, so you can pick your style according to taste.

There is an advertised advantage of defining the function using:

void MyThings::DoStuff() {
    // Do this.
}

which is that in order to do it, the function must have already been declared. Thus, errors like:

void MyThings::DoStuf() {
    // Do this.
}

or

void MyThings::DoStuff(int i) {
    // Do this.
}

are caught when you compile MyThings.cpp. If you define

namespace MyThings {
    void DoStuff(int i) {
        // Do this.
    }
}

then you generally won't get an error until someone in another source file tries to call the function, and the linker complains. Obviously if your testing is non-rubbish you'll catch the error one way or another, but sooner is often better and you might get a better error message out of the compiler than the linker.

share|improve this answer
    
+1. But I think you're missing part of the last –  larsmans Oct 5 '12 at 10:24
    
+1 for the "must have been declared". for some strange reason i've never thought of that. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Oct 5 '12 at 10:27
    
+1. Great answer, answers the question and tells me the implications of using my desired way of defining the functions in the namespace. I had never thought of that either. –  Brandon Miller Oct 5 '12 at 10:27
    
+1 Good point about the link time error. I hadn't even considered that. –  juanchopanza Oct 5 '12 at 10:43

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