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In Windows 8, when you minimize a game and switch to it back again, then the game will be displayed very fast. It looks like that the screen was ready even before you told your PC to show the game. When you do the same in Windows 7, then it will take a second till you see the game. This time it looks like Direct X was suspended and the Video card needs time to prepare the screen.

So the question is, does Windows 8 render the game in the background and does Windows 7 begin to render when it is going to be displayed? Or is this because a change in the Windows API?

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Do you use the same hardware and DirectX run time library for your test? I don't think that's a OS related performance issue, since most of DirectX program/game will stop rendering when they were minimized in order to release CPU time to other programs

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On Windows 7 I have Direct X 11 and on Windows 8 Direct X 11.1. That is the only difference. I tested this on the same PC. Its almost imposable that the game is not rendering in the background. On Windows 8 you get the game on the foreground faster then you can blink with your eyes. On Windows 7 you can see that the game stopped rendering in the background. –  Dagob Oct 5 '12 at 13:29
    
Why the game need to render in the background(here I mean when it was minimized)? –  zdd Oct 5 '12 at 14:25
    
In my personal opinion, the way how the game restored from minimized state depends on how you handle the active state of the program, so it's depends on how to write the program, not the system. –  zdd Oct 5 '12 at 14:29
    
That is true, Thanks! –  Dagob Oct 6 '12 at 11:37

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