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This is somewhat different question or maybe a easy question. but I have this problem now.

I have three forms loginForm, mainForm and subForm.
In my loginForm I have two accounts, one for mainForm access and other for subForm access.
The mainFormAccessAccount can access both mainForm and subForm but the subFormAccessAccount can only access subForm.
Through mainForm we can create multiple instances of subForm (mainForm is single instance).

Now my problem is: I want to implement different subForm_Closed Event functions for a subForm and its Instances (instances created by mainForm).

I used the below code to create the instances of subForm in subForm.cs

private mainForm MainForm;
    internal void RegisterParent(mainForm form)
    {
        this.MainForm = form;
    }

and in mainForm.cs to create instance of subForm, I used the below code:

subForm newSubForm = new subForm();
newSubForm.Show();
newSubForm.RegisterParent(this);

How can I solve this issue?
(I am not sure whether they are called instances or not because I am a Dot net noob)

Thanks in Advance.

share|improve this question
    
Please let me know If you cant understand any part of my explanation. –  Mr_Green Oct 5 '12 at 10:50
1  
I would change "How can I solve this issue" to whatever the actual question is. What issue? What's the problem you're encountering? –  Bob Horn Oct 5 '12 at 11:17
    
@BobHorn I need to give different Form closed event functions for a subForm and its instance. I am poor in english. If you understand my explanation please edit it. –  Mr_Green Oct 5 '12 at 11:18

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If I understand your problem correctly you want two different handlers for close event of the SubForm.

  1. One handler for close events of the SubForm created through subFormAccessAccount
  2. Another handler for close events of the SubForm created through MainForm

As you suspected, this is indeed an easy problem and since you mentioned you are a .net noob I will try to explain in detail.

If I am not wrong you generated the event handler subForm_Closed using Visual studio designer surface. This seems to be the cause of your confusion.

What does the Visual Studio Designer do to generate event handler:

If you open SubForm.cs notice the definition of its constructor. It will be something like this

public SubForm()
{
     InitializeComponent();
     //May be some other code as well
}

This InitializeComponent method is described in SubForm.designer.cs file () (expand SubForm.cs in solution explorer and you will be able to see it).

One of the lines in InitializeComponent method will be something like this

this.FormClosed += new System.Windows.Forms.FormClosedEventHandler(this.SubForm_Closed);

So in effect as soon as you create a SubForm 'instance' (here I mean real object instance and not in the sense you mentioned in your question which is at best a child form) either through subFormAccessAccount or through MainForm, it attached your SubForm_Closed event handler to the FormClosed event.

How can you get the desired behavior?

If you want to handle the closed event in SubForm.cs, you can do something like this

internal void RegisterParent(mainForm form)
{
    this.MainForm = form;
    this.FormClosed -= SubForm_Closed; //Unhook previous handler
    this.FormClosed += SubFormAsChild_Closed; //hook new handler
}

If you want to handle the closed event in MainForm.cs, you can do like this

internal void RegisterParent(mainForm form)
{
    this.MainForm = form;
    this.FormClosed -= SubForm_Closed;
}

//in MainForm.cs
newSubForm.RegisterParent(this);
newSubForm.FormClosed += newSubForm_Closed;
share|improve this answer
    
Well you understood my explanation correctly and I learnt more new things from you. Thank you. I will try this. –  Mr_Green Oct 5 '12 at 11:57
    
Glad to help :) –  Amit Mittal Oct 5 '12 at 12:00
    
Perfect this worked. :) –  Mr_Green Oct 5 '12 at 12:03

Several ways to go Add another constructor to SubForm

e.g.

public SubForm(Boolean argCreatedByMainForm) : this()
{
// save argument in private member variable for use in OnCloseQuery
}

then use

subForm newSubForm = new subForm(true);
newSubForm.Show();
newSubForm.RegisterParent(this); 

It's not the way I'd go, because having one form know about another, tends to turn into a maintenance nightmare, but you'd need some more tools in your programming box to implement better solutions. A class to manage the interraction between forms for instance, then abstract them out to interfaces, last but not least inject the behaviour.

Seeing as you are learning, get constructor working, the you can progress to stupidly clever as you pick up the techniques

share|improve this answer
    
very useful post. :) –  Mr_Green Oct 5 '12 at 13:04
subForm newSubForm = new subForm();
newSubForm.Show();
newSubForm.RegisterParent(this);
newSubForm.Close += (s, e) =>
{
   // Close event will be fired for this instance only.
};
share|improve this answer

I would recommend to have an other structure of you mainform - subform referencing.

Your Subform is dervived from System.Windows.Forms.Form, which is derived from System.Windows.Forms.Control, which actualy has already one property to store a parent control: So you should store there the reference to the main form.

The other thing is that you should implement a static method to create subforms in your mainform, which acutaly calls a private methods of the single instance reference to create the real subform - i asume that you you the singleton pattern.

so code would look like this

public class MainForm : System.Windows.Forms.Form 
{
  // used to hold references to subforms note: not static
  private List<SubForm> mySubForms;

  // singelton implementation
  private static MainForm theInstance = null;      
  private MainForm()
  {
     mySubForms = new List<SubForm>();
  }
  public static MainForm GET_INSTANCE()
  {
     if (MainForm.theInstance == null)
     {
       MainForm.theInstance = new MainForm();
     }
     return MainForm.theInstance;
  }

  // creates subforms and the references right not:static method as singelton 
  //pattern is used
  public static SubForm CREATE_SUBFORM()
  {
     SubForm newSub = new SubForm();
     newSub.Parent = theInstance;
     theInstance.mySubForms.Add(newSub);
     return newSub;
  }
}

Please aplogize if the code has some typing errors ... i dont have an IDE right now. Obiously I didnt implement the singelton pattern threadsafe...this would be corss the edge for demonstraion purpose.

Edit: An even better practise would be to let forms comunicate by making use of evetns. This would be the best way if you plan to have a multithreaded application. But you need advanced .Net skills to it this - imo.

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