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I have an iterator p and a vertex curvePoints:

for (p = curvePoints.begin(); p != curvePoints.end(); p++) {
  p->x = (1 - u) * p->x + u * (p+1)->x;
  p->y = (1 - u) * p->y + u * (p+1)->y;
}

Right now the loops use the value of the next indexed object; how can I guarantee that that next value exists. In other words, how can I make the loop condition something like (p+1) != curvePoints.end() or p != curvePoints.end() - 1.

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This has nothing to do with OpenGL api's. –  TheAmateurProgrammer Oct 5 '12 at 10:49
    
By "vertex" do you mean "vector"? –  Joseph Mansfield Oct 5 '12 at 10:53

5 Answers 5

How about changing p != curvePoints.end() to
(p != curvePoints.end()) && ((p + 1) != curvePoints.end())?

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It wont work if his iterator isn't a random access iterator, will it ? –  tomahh Oct 5 '12 at 10:51
1  
@TomAhh: Neither will the loop's inner code. –  krlmlr Oct 5 '12 at 10:59
    
@user946850 Ok, I did not read this.. Thank you. –  tomahh Oct 5 '12 at 11:00

You can use std::distance(p, curvePoints.end()) > 1 as you condition.

http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/std/iterator/distance/

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You can cache and reuse the value of p-s successor:

auto p = curvePoints.begin();
if (p != curvePoints.end()) {
  auto pn = p; ++pn;
  for (; pn != curvePoints.end(); p = pn, ++pn) {
    ... // use pn instead of (p+1)
  }
}

NB: Pre-increment is preferable for iterators.

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The way I would do it is to not compare against end() unless the sequence is empty. If the sequence is non-empty you would compare against end() - 1 and probably cache the value:

for (auto p(points.begin()), 
          end(c.end() - (c.empty()? 0, 1));
     p != end; ++p) {
    ...
}
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 for (p = curvePoints.begin(); p < curvePoints.end(); p++) {
          p->x = (1 - u) * p->x + u * (p+1)->x;
          p->y = (1 - u) * p->y + u * (p+1)->y;
share|improve this answer
    
The great majority of iterators do not support <. But worse, this doesn't even work for the ones that do. p<end implies p != end. –  MSalters Oct 5 '12 at 11:05

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