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I have read a rule somewhere to:

Follow the single-entry/single-exit rule. Never write multiple return statements in the same function.

Is this statement true? If that so, could you please give more detail as to why we should follow this rule?

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closed as not a real question by BЈовић, Anteru, Bo Persson, Oleh Prypin, csgillespie Oct 5 '12 at 20:22

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
"Is this true?" Well you don't have to follow it, the language is perfectly happy with multiple return statements, and in my opinion it's fine to use them. The problem is when you have a lot of returns in complicated nested logic. That can be hard to follow. If your function has a lot of returns you probably need to refactor. You may also be interested to know that in Fortran, functions can have multiple entry points as well, and people do use them. –  BoBTFish Oct 5 '12 at 11:39
4  
I always thought that rule is stupid in coding rules –  BЈовић Oct 5 '12 at 11:39
1  
It's also worth remembering that your functions may exit via an exception as well, complicating things further, and it's often difficult to know where they might come from. –  BoBTFish Oct 5 '12 at 11:43
1  
This sounds like something a C programmer might say. In C++, early exit is a very useful idiom. –  Kerrek SB Oct 5 '12 at 11:54

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm personally not opposed to early-exit, but I'll propose a third alternative to SingerOfTheFall for consideration.

Advantages:

  • normal code flow (i.e. non-error) flows cleanly through the top of the code
  • no chance of failing one "something" and passing another "something" inadvertently executing a block of code
  • you can enforce scope on code blocks; including clean-up on exit of scope for things used in sub-blocks of code

Disadvantage:

  • indentations can add up (although this can be mitigated by breaking into sub-functions)
  • without brace-matching in your editor it can be difficult to match error with failed condition
int foo()
{
    int errorCode = 0;
    if(!something) {
        //100 lines of code
        if(!something) {
            //100 lines of code
            if(!something) {
                //100 lines of code
            }
            else {
                errorCode = -1;
            }
        }
        else {
            errorCode = 11;
       }
    }
    else {
        errorCode = 1;
    }
    return errorCode;
}
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No, this is not a rule, and sometimes it is even difficult/impossible to achieve. The code that has one entry and one exit point is easier to understand and debug though. Compare this:

int foo()
{
    if(something)
        return 0;
    //100 lines of code
    if(something)
        return 11;
    //100 lines of code
    if(something)
        return -1;
    //100 lines of code
    return 0;
}

and this:

int foo()
{
    int errorCode = 0;
    if(something)
        errorCode = 1;
    //100 lines of code
    if(something)
        errorCode = 11;
    //100 lines of code
    if(something)
        errorCode = -1;
    //100 lines of code
    return errorCode;
}

Now we have just one exit point, and (taking into account the variable name too) it's much easier to understand what the function does. You can also place a breakpoint onto the last return and know that this is the point where function ends, and that you will definitely hit it.

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The example with errorCode may not be the best one, since you may want to actually stop execution right where the error occurs, but I hope you get the idea. –  SingerOfTheFall Oct 5 '12 at 11:42
    
Actually, your second example might be bugged, if it's supposed to do the same as the first since "return" stops executing the function, whereas you are continuing with the code that follows. In cases like this, I generally check the return value for a special "not set" value that gets set at the beginning. –  Christian Stieber Oct 5 '12 at 11:44

Is this true?

That's what the rule says. Is it a good rule? I fight against its adoption tooth and nail. I think its a stupid rule. Worse than stupid: It's a harmful rule.

I do agree with the first part of the rule, "single entry". The Fortran entry statement causes a lot more problems than it solves. This first part of the rule does not pertain to C or C++ for the simple reason that neither language provides a multiple entry point mechanism. "Single entry" is a no-op in C and C++.

So what about "single exit"? Early return does not necessarily cause problems. Failing to deal with allocated resources prior to returning is what causes problems. The right rule is "clean up your mess", or don't leave dangling resources. Single exit does not solve this problem because it doesn't say a thing about cleaning up your mess.

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Also, multiple exits could be some performance issue: when processor runs the current command, at the same clock tick it processes several next commands and performs some operations with them. So, if your code has multiple exits, like this:

if (condition)
  return a;
DoSomething();
if (condition2)
  return b;

and first condition is true, extraction of DoSomething() command will be useless. Actually, with branch prediction it still can be fine, but anyway it is better keep this thing in mind.

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No, its not performance issue in-fact low level programming do similar. It only programming style. –  Grijesh Chauhan Oct 5 '12 at 12:09
1  
It does not matter what do you do: high level, or low level, your program can be sequential or contain cross-code jumps on both of them. Anyway jumps are not good for performance because of parallel instruction handling inside the processor. What is exactly the point you disagree with me? –  Choufler Oct 5 '12 at 12:56
    
Jump cause hard to bug a code that why structural programming come in concept. But execution efficiency is not a issue in high level programming(if its not a part of algorithm). So your answer is not related to question asked....any ways i was unaware of that "jumps are not good for performance because of parallel instruction handling inside the processor". Good Point. –  Grijesh Chauhan Oct 5 '12 at 17:39

This rule may apply in C, but it can be considered obsolete in C++ because of exceptions. As soon as your function throws an exception or calls a function that can throw, you have an additional exit point:

int f()
{
  //...
  g(); // g() may throw: you have an exit point here
  //...
  throw exc; // another possible exit point
  //...
  return returnValue; // Nice try, but you have additional exit points
}

This in addition to the point made in other answers: this rule intends to make the code easier to follow, but it is easy to find examples where this is not true. Much better:

if (condition)
  return a;
if (condition2)
  return b;
if (condition3)
  return c;

// Insert all your code for the general case

than:

int returnValue;    
if (!condition) {
  if (!condition2) {
    if (!condition3) {
      // Insert your code here
    else
      returnValue = c;
    }
    returnValue = b;  // Where am I now?
  }
  returnValue = a;
}
return returnValue;

And then you also have the case when you decide the return value in a switch:

switch (a)
{
  case 1: return 10;
  case 2: return 20;
  case 3: return 40;
  default: return 50;
}

rather than:

int returnValue;
switch (a)
{
  case 1: returnValue = 10; break;
  case 2: returnValue = 20; break;
  case 3: returnValue = 40; break;
  default: returnValue = 50; break;
}
return returnValue; // Where is the clarity gained?
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Some coding standards have a "no exceptions" rule. Those that also have a "single point of entry / single point of exit" rule justify the "no exceptions" rule on the basis of this singularly bad rule. –  David Hammen Oct 5 '12 at 12:33
    
@Jarod42 Ah, sure. Thank you. –  Gorpik Oct 26 '13 at 14:00

You can store your return value in a variable if you want to achieve this, but it's not true. You can have multiple returns in the same function without problems.

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