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>>> c=[1,2,3]
>>> c[1]=c 
>>> d=[1,2,3]
>>> d[1:]=d

>>> print(c)
[1, [...], 3] # Why does C become [1, [...], 3]?
>>> print(d)
[1, 1, 2, 3] # Why is d not [1, [...] ]?

Excuse me, where is the code different? Is it the :, or something else?

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Why do you nest a list inside itself? –  user647772 Oct 5 '12 at 11:36
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3 Answers

You are using an index and a slice assignment, which are quite different.

Compare this with indexing and slicing the list in an expression:

>>> c=[1,2,3]
>>> c[1]
2
>>> d=[1,2,3]
>>> d[1:]
[2, 3]

By using a : colon in the list index, you are asking for a slice, which is always another list.

In Python you can assign values to both an individual item in a list, and to a slice of the list.

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thank you very much –  Chia's JaJa Oct 5 '12 at 12:20
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slicing is used to extract a sublist of a list where as indexing is used to retrive a specific element of list

slicedList = aList[beginIndex:endIndex]

d[1:] refers to slicing the list d - refer to this. - This is slicing

c[1] is an element of the list c. - this is indexing

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thank you very much –  Chia's JaJa Oct 5 '12 at 12:21
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print(c) [1, [...], 3] # Why does C become [1, [...], 3]?

When you are doing c1 = c, you are assigning c itself to the second position of c. This way you are creating cyclic reference.So instead of showing again the list, interprepreter showing [...] to indicate its cyclic reference. See this for more info

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thank you very much –  Chia's JaJa Oct 5 '12 at 12:22
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