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I am just trying to make a function that fills an array with objects, but something is wrong:

row1 = []

class Tile
    def initialize(type)
        @type = type
    end
end

def FillRow1

    [1..10].each {
        random = rand(1..3)
        if random == 1 row1.(Tile.new("land") end 
        else if random == 2 row1.(Tile.new("Water") end
        else ifrandom == 3 row1.(Tile.new("empty") end
    }
    row1
end
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closed as too localized by sawa, DrummerB, Justin Boo, the Tin Man, ЯegDwight Oct 8 '12 at 19:15

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6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your syntax is wrong

    [1..10].each {
        random = rand(1..3)
        if random == 1 then row1.push(Tile.new("land")) end 
        else if random == 2 then row1.push(Tile.new("Water")) end
        else ifrandom == 3 then row1.push(Tile.new("empty") end
    }

This would work.

But a cleaner solution may be:

types = ["Land","Water","Empty"]
10.times{ row1 << Tile.new(types[rand(0..2)]) }
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so "<<" adds the object to the array? And I can use rand directly on arrays? –  Борис Цейтлин Oct 5 '12 at 11:59
    
Yes, << is an overloaded operator, basically a syntax sugar for push. And we're not using rand on an array, instead, we only used the result, rand(x..y) returns a number, which we used as the index to fetch the corresponding item of the array types. –  Need4Steed Oct 5 '12 at 12:12

Your second else if is wrong, there must be a space between random and the if.

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a= ["land", "water", "empty"]
data= (1..10).map{ a[rand(3)] }
p data
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A one-line option:

10.times.map{ Tile.new(["land","water","empty"][rand(3)]) }
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Recent versions of Ruby (>= 1.9.3) come with method #sample. It is part of Array. You can use it to get random element(s) from array without even knowing how big array even is.

class Tile
    TILE_TYPES = %w(land water empty)

    def initialize(type)
        @type = type
    end

    def to_s
        "Tile of type: #{@type}"
    end
end

# Generate 10 tiles
rows = (1..10).map do 
    Tile.new Tile::TILE_TYPES.sample
end

puts rows
#=> Tile of type: empty
#   Tile of type: land
#   ...

# If you want to pick more then 1 random element you can also do
puts Tile::TILE_TYPES.sample(3)
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class Tile
  def initialize(type)
    @type = type
  end
end

types = %w(land water empty)

row = Array.new(10){ Tile.new(types.sample) }
share|improve this answer
    
@Emil 2 spaces indentation is standard in ruby. –  steenslag Oct 5 '12 at 19:13
    
Oops, sorry! :) –  Emil Oct 5 '12 at 20:37

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