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I have this code:

var cadena = prompt("Cadena:");

document.write(mayusminus(cadena));

function mayusminus(cad){
    var resultado = "Desconocido";

    if(cad.match(new RegExp("[A-Z]"))){
        resultado="mayúsculas";
    }else{
        if(cad.match(new RegExp("[a-z]"))){
            resultado="minúsculas";
        }else{
            if(cad.match(new RegExp("[a-zA-z]"))){
            resultado = "minúsculas y MAYUSCULAS";
            }
        }
    }
    return resultado;
}

I always have mayusculas or minusculas, never minusculas y MAYUSCULAS (MIXED), I am learning regexp and dont know my error yet :S

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Please add the call of mayusminus to your question, including its parameters, the expected result and the actual result. –  Zeta Oct 5 '12 at 12:08
    
you have a mistake in the last [a-zA-z] - it should be [a-zA-Z] in any case (pun intended) –  mplungjan Oct 5 '12 at 12:18
    
Zeta you can read all the post and you see the call to mayusminus, and the expected result and actual result :S –  user1422434 Oct 5 '12 at 14:00
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted
new RegExp("[A-Z]")

matches when any character in cadena is an upper-case letter. To match when all characters are upper-case, use

new RegExp("^[A-Z]+$")

The ^ forces it to start at the start, the $ forces it to end at the end and the + ensures that between the end there are one or more of [A-Z].

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Thanks! I understand regex better now :) –  user1422434 Oct 5 '12 at 14:04
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I believe you wanted to use regex patterns ^[a-z]+$, ^[A-Z]+$ and ^[a-zA-Z]+$.

In regex, the caret ^ matches the position before the first character in the string. Similarly, $ matches right after the last character in the string. Additionaly, + means one or more occurrences.

It is necessary to use ^ and $ in the pattern, if you want to ensure no other then listed characters are in the string.


JavaScript:

s = 'tEst';
r = (s.match(new RegExp("^[a-z]+$")))    ? 'minúsculas' :
    (s.match(new RegExp("^[A-Z]+$")))    ? 'mayúsculas' :
    (s.match(new RegExp("^[a-zA-Z]+$"))) ? 'minúsculas y mayúsculas' :
                                           'desconocido';

Test this code here.

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Thanks! I understand regex better now :) –  user1422434 Oct 5 '12 at 14:05
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Let's say cad is foo:

// will return false
if (cad.match(new RegExp("[A-Z]"))) {
    resultado="mayúsculas";
// so will go there
} else {
    // will return true
    if (cad.match(new RegExp("[a-z]"))) {
        // so will go there
        resultado="minúsculas";
    } else {
        if (cad.match(new RegExp("[a-zA-z]"))) {
            resultado = "minúsculas y MAYUSCULAS";
        }
    }
}

Now, let's say cad is FOO:

// will return true
if (cad.match(new RegExp("[A-Z]"))) {
    // so will go there
    resultado="mayúsculas";
} else {
    if (cad.match(new RegExp("[a-z]"))) {
        resultado="minúsculas";
    } else {
        if (cad.match(new RegExp("[a-zA-z]"))) {
            resultado = "minúsculas y MAYUSCULAS";
        }
    }
}

Finally, let's say cad is FoO:

// will return true
if (cad.match(new RegExp("[A-Z]"))) {
    // so will go there
    resultado="mayúsculas";
} else {
    if (cad.match(new RegExp("[a-z]"))) {
        resultado="minúsculas";
    } else {
        if(cad.match(new RegExp("[a-zA-z]"))) {
            resultado = "minúsculas y MAYUSCULAS";
        }
    }
}

As you can see, the nested else is never visited.

What you can do is:

if (cad.match(new RegExp("^[A-Z]+$"))) {
    resultado="mayúsculas";
} else if (cad.match(new RegExp("^[a-z]+$"))) {
    resultado="minúsculas";
} else {
    resultado = "minúsculas y MAYUSCULAS";
}

Explanation:

^ means from the beginning of the string,

$ means to the end of the string,

<anything>+ means at least one anything.

That said,

^[A-Z]+$ means the string should only contains uppercased chars,

^[a-z]+$ means the string should only contains lowercased chars.

So if the string isn't only composed by uppercased or lowercased chars, the string contains both of them.

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