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I need to be able to identify a user in my RESTful service. I decided to use HTTPS with client certificate authentication, so it will allow other services to pass user or passwords in URL, header or whatever way safely.

Now I want to encrypt some data being sent back to a service. For instance, instead of sending plain user ID - just encrypt it with my own server key and send back. Then the service will send this (encrypted) data, and I will be able to decrypt it locally.

To to this encryption I would like to use SSL certificate presented to me by the service.

I guess that the certificate, which is located on my server, contains both private and public keys. So I could use my server-side certificate's public key to encrypt the data and be sure that I can safely decrypt it with private key on server-side. The third-party service won't be able to decrypt the data because it will have only public key of my server-side certificate.

Now the question - given client SSL certificate in format of X509Certificate from client (HTTPS), how do I find out corresponding certificates in my local keystore? What will be the format of that certificate and how to get private / public key from it?

UPD the basic flow:

what I want to get

  • service sends request to REST app: http://rest.api.com/authenticate/username/password/
  • REST app takes username/password and find out user ID in database
  • REST app doesn't want to share the ID with the service
  • REST app knows about SSL certificate of service
  • REST app finds out the corresponding public key, used to encrypt incoming traffic to that service
  • REST app encrypts the id "123456" with REST app public key and sends response : { ok : "lybibHubJis7" }
  • service sends request to REST app: http://rest.api.com/lybibHubJis7/dosomething
  • REST app decrypts string lybibHubJis7 using private key of SSL keychain, and finds out that user ID is 123456, then performs operation with this user.
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closed as not a real question by EJP, AVD, j0k, Aleks G, Toon Krijthe Oct 10 '12 at 8:35

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Why? You're already using HTTPS. That does all the encryption you need. And given a client certificate arriving over the wire, why do you need to locate another copy of it? And why do you need its private key! This doesn't make much sense. –  EJP Oct 5 '12 at 12:13
    
Yes, but I want to hide some appication data. For example, I don't want to establish and maintain "authenticated users" sessions. –  jdevelop Oct 5 '12 at 12:15
    
You are hiding it. It's encrypted, via HTTPS, which is HTTP over SSL. –  EJP Oct 5 '12 at 12:16
    
Not really. For example service sent request: rest.api.com/authenticate/username/password, then I reply with something in JSON, containing the string 123456. Then the service would use rest.api.com/do/123456/whatever. What I want is to hide "123456" from service. And I don't want to generate some random string and put it into database, and maintain relation "PreabEdAgIav" -> "123456" with expiration etc. I want to use my own public key, associated with the service, to encrypt this 123456 and get something else, which the service will not be able to break. –  jdevelop Oct 5 '12 at 12:20
    
I think that if the client already has that SSL certificate given, then I have public key/private key of my server in my keystore, so why not to reuse it? –  jdevelop Oct 5 '12 at 12:21
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Trying to jump into the middle of a discussion with multiple comments...

Not really. For example service sent request: rest.api.com/authenticate/username/password, then I reply with something in JSON, containing the string 123456. Then the service would use rest.api.com/do/123456/whatever. What I want is to hide "123456" from service. And I don't want to generate some random string and put it into database, and maintain relation "PreabEdAgIav" -> "123456" with expiration etc. I want to use my own public key, associated with the service, to encrypt this 123456 and get something else, which the service will not be able to break.

It sounds like the main thing you're after is digital signature, not necessarily encryption (although you could have both).

If your authenticating service gives you some sort of authentication token (123456) that 3rd party services are meant to send back for subsequent uses, what matters the most is that the consuming service should be able to verify that this 123456 came indeed from that authenticating service. Since anyone can encrypt something using the recipient's public key, public key encryption doesn't really help here.

What would make more sense is to have the authentication service sign this 123456 token with its private key, so that the service consuming that token later on can verify it came from a former authentication step that it recognises. If you also want to hide that token, you can also encrypt the result, but that seems less necessary.

There are standards to do this such as SAML, although using the HTTP URL binding can lead to fairly long URLs.

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Well, that might work as well, however I need to verify the signature somehow. And I definitely don't want to maintain 2 keystores - one for SSL connection and one for verification, I want to re-use the one, used for SSL encryption. –  jdevelop Oct 5 '12 at 12:44
    
You don't need 2. You sign with the private key, verify with the public. It's the opposite way around to encryption. –  David Grant Oct 5 '12 at 12:47
1  
Worrying about where the keystores are loaded from would be the least of my concern in this overall scheme. Most webapp containers prevent webapps from accessing the SSL/TLS connector private keys, but with enough administrative control, you can of course configure a webapp to use a keystore of your choice. You still seem to be confused regarding when encryption and when digital signatures are useful in this sort of security scheme. You might want to read up about delegated authentication/identity mechanisms: either the SAML-based family like Shibboleth, OpenSSO or perhaps OAuth. –  Bruno Oct 5 '12 at 12:55
    
@DavidGrant where do I get those private and public keys? –  jdevelop Oct 5 '12 at 12:55
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