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I have created some UITableViews in storyboard and written custom classes for each of them. I have dragged and dropped the tableview objects into my main view controller to access them. In the UITableView custom classes, I allocate some class level objects in "numberOfSectionsInTableView" delegate method. I want to release all the class level objects allocated in the numberOfSectionsInTableView method in the dealloc method. But the dealloc is not getting called even if I move to some other view controller. Does anyone have any idea why this is not called, or where else I can release these objects. (ARC is turned off)

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where's the code? –  J2theC Oct 5 '12 at 12:14
    
Possible duplicated stackoverflow.com/questions/9219030/… –  alexandresoli Oct 5 '12 at 12:17
    
What are "class level objects"? And in what -dealloc are you trying to release them? –  Caleb Oct 5 '12 at 13:07
    
I meant to say class level variables. In the UITableView custom class's dealloc im tryiing to release them. –  saikamesh Oct 5 '12 at 16:29

2 Answers 2

Here are some things you could do:

  1. turn ARC on?
  2. Are you sure its not accessed? make an NSLog(@"ACCESSED"); in your dealloc method
  3. use viewDidUnload method to release things
  4. directly release them in their methods if they are not needed anymore
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+1 for ARC -- it's the right solution here. –  Caleb Oct 5 '12 at 13:09
    
You can turn on ARC and changing the build flags, you can disable ARC for some specific headers if you like.. click on your project -->targets -->build phases --> "Compile Sources" and then double click on a .m file and type in "-fno-objc-arc" this will diable ARC for the specific file ,) –  xCoder Oct 5 '12 at 13:17

Try to find something about UIViewController life cycle. Try to release your objects in viewDidUnload method and put breakpoints there. This pic should be useful for you: enter image description here

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