Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a table with 2 columns:

nid realm
1   domain_id
1   domain_site
2   domain_id
3   domain_id

I want every entry to have 1 entry for domain id, and 1 for domain site. So I want to end up with:

nid realm
1   domain_id
1   domain_site
2   domain_id
2   domain_site
3   domain_id
3   domain_site

If I was doing this in PHP, I'd just foreach through the whole list and insert the extra line whenever it didn't exist. Unfortunately I only have PHPmyAdmin access to this DB. Is there a way to do this in straight SQL?

(If it makes a difference: The table has about 3000 rows currently, of which I think about 2000 will need the extra line inserted. Also, this is a one-time thing so it does not need to be optimized/uber-slick.)

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted
INSERT IGNORE INTO `table`
SELECT `alt1`.`nid`, `alt2`.`realm`
FROM `table` AS `alt1`, `table` AS `alt2`
share|improve this answer
    
ooh, shiny IGNORE keyword –  Jacob Krall Aug 13 '09 at 21:23
    
That IS shiny!! I don't know what it says about me that I don't even understand this code, but I used it anyway! And it worked! (I backed up first. :) –  Eileen Aug 13 '09 at 21:34
    
Glad you like it. :) It's doing something that under most circumstances would be very bad, a join with no conditions; I don't know what the academic term for it is, but I think of it as an "explosive join", because it results in all possible combinations of the two tables. Here, it all works out fine because you're inserting into a table with a unique constraint, so you just get the unique combinations that you care about, and the IGNORE makes any duplicate combinations fall out. –  chaos Aug 13 '09 at 21:40
1  
chaos, a cross join is the term you are looking for –  HLGEM Aug 13 '09 at 21:42
    
Oh, is that all? Okay, thanks. (My surprise is because of course I've seen the term around, but I hadn't thought of it in connection with this unconstrained form, since all the cross joins I ever saw or wrote had linking conditions in the WHERE clause.) –  chaos Aug 13 '09 at 21:44

I think this will do it, but I don't have a place to test it right now and I'm used to Sql Server rather than MySQL:

INSERT INTO `table`
SELECT id.nid, r.realm
FROM (SELECT nid FROM `table` GROUP BY nid) id
CROSS JOIN (SELECT realm FROM `table` GROUP BY realm) r
LEFT JOIN `table` t ON t.nid=id.nid AND t.realm=r.realm
WHERE t.realm IS NULL
share|improve this answer
insert into MyTable
(nid, realm)
select nid, 'domain_id'
from MyTable m where not exists (
    select 1 
    from MyTable
    where MyTable.nid = m.nid and realm = 'domain_id'
)
union all
select nid, 'domain_site'
from MyTable m where not exists (
    select 1 
    from MyTable
    where MyTable.nid = m.nid and realm = 'domain_site'
)
share|improve this answer

If you have a UNIQUE constraint over (nid, realm), you could do this:

INSERT IGNORE INTO nidTable (nid, realm)
  SELECT nid, 'domain_site'
  FROM nidTable WHERE realm = 'domain_id';
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.