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The following code, obviously, gives a rather weird result.

char[] data = new char[5];
data[0] = 'a';
data[1] = 'b';
data[2] = 'c';

out.println("'" + new String(data) + "'");

'abc□□'

Is there a way to create a string from a character array which takes into account that the whole array might not be filled to the end with characters?


Reason for question: When using the Reader.read(char[]) method you give it a character array to fill, which I can only assume won't be fully filled, unless you're lucky, when you reach the end of the stream. So was wondering how you could turn this into a string you could append to a StringBuffer. Realize now though that the read method actually returns the number of bytes read though, which I assume can be used in combination with StringBuffer.append(char[], int, int), which renders my question moot. But, still something I am curious about and not something I managed to find by googling, so I guess this question is good to have an answer for here ;)

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Is it the case that the solution must cope with embedded null characters and if so, what should the behavior be? –  hmjd Oct 5 '12 at 12:30
    
If by embedded you mean mixed in with the other characters, then no. –  Svish Oct 5 '12 at 12:33
2  
The real question here is how did the null chars get there in the first place? Are you ignoring a read result count further back? –  EJP Oct 5 '12 at 12:35
    
@EJP Honestly I didn't think of the read result until after I posted this question so the question is kind of moot for my particular case now, but still curious if there are any smart solutions for when you don't have that count :) –  Svish Oct 5 '12 at 12:46
1  
Reader.read(char[]) returns how many characters were read. –  Roger Lindsjö Oct 5 '12 at 12:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The String has constructorString(char[] value, int offset, int count) that accepts an array of char plus length (and offset):

String s = new String(data, 0, 3);

Assuming no embedded null characters (where a leading null character is considered to be an embedded null) in data the solution would need to locate the first null character to determine the number of char in data:

int length = 0;
while (length < data.length && 0 != data[length]) length++;
String s = new String(data, 0, length);
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1  
Assumes the OP knows in advance which chars are missing. –  Duncan Oct 5 '12 at 12:24
    
@DuncanJones, yes it does. –  hmjd Oct 5 '12 at 12:24
    
This does not work of the missing chars are not at the edge. –  Baz Oct 5 '12 at 12:26
    
@Baz, what do you mean by edge ? –  hmjd Oct 5 '12 at 12:27
    
@hmjd Sorry, I meant ab□c□ for example. In this case your method won't eliminate the first missing char. –  Baz Oct 5 '12 at 12:27

Yes there is use string constructor with offset and length.

 String(char[] value, int offset, int count) 

 new String(data,0,3) 

Now if exact value is not known then you can write utility method to correct the array. Or use trim() to trim trailing characters.

 public static char[] getNotMessedUpArray(char[] messedUp) {

    int messedUpIndex = messedUp.length;
    for (int i = 0; i < messedUp.length; i++) {
        if (messedUp[i] <= ' ') {
            System.arraycopy(messedUp, i + 1, messedUp, i, messedUp.length
                    - i - 1);
        }
    }
    for (int i = 0; i < messedUp.length; i++) {
        if (messedUp[i] <= ' ') {
            messedUpIndex--;
        }
    }
    char[] notMessedUp = new char[messedUpIndex];
    System.arraycopy(messedUp, 0, notMessedUp, 0, messedUpIndex);
    return notMessedUp;

}
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1  
Then you'd have to know exactly how many have been set though. –  Svish Oct 5 '12 at 12:30
    
Then you will have to iterate over string and check that each character is <= ' '//Space char and create new string. –  AmitD Oct 5 '12 at 12:33

I can't think of a robust method that doesn't work as follows:

char[] data = new char[5];
data[0] = 'a';
data[1] = 'b';
data[2] = 'c';

StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
for (char c : data) {
  if (c != 0x00) {
    builder.append(c);
  }
}

System.out.println(builder.toString());

This specifically omits characters with a value equal to the default (0x00). Note, this is far from perfect as 0x00 is a legitimate char. I would suggest you re-evaluate the design decisions that lead you to this point.

I'm not a fan of the solutions that assume ((char) 0x00) is whitespace and can be trimmed. Even if it works. Note that:

System.out.println(' ' == ((char) 0x00));

will print false.

share|improve this answer
    
Is 0x00 different from just 0? –  Svish Oct 5 '12 at 12:48
    
No. Just a habit of mine. –  Duncan Oct 5 '12 at 13:01
    
@DuncanJones - It should be noted that the OP has clarified his question to make it clear that 1) the invalid characters are always at the end, and 2) he knows the position of the last valid character. –  Stephen C Oct 6 '12 at 3:34

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