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I need to hold a list of object types that are allowed to do certain actions.

Example Animal has 3 descendants Tiger, Human, Hippo

I want to allow only Tigers and Hippos to be held in zoo cages? I need a list of animal types.

I would love something better than List<Type>

This is just a simplified example. I don't like animals in cages..

edit

Since it's not clear. I want to hold object types in the list and not actual objects.

Example:

List<Type> types = new List<Type>();
types.Add(typeof(Hippo));
types.Add(typeof(Tiger));

This has the limit that a programmer can do types.Add(typeof(Human)) and this is what I wan't to dissallow.

edit2

Just to clarify my question. I want to be able to dynamically Register allowed types and not having consequent ifs as some answers bellow.

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2  
I want to allow only Tigers and Hippos to be held in zoo cages This is too allegorical for me. Can you please give a code example of what you want to do? –  Tudor Oct 5 '12 at 12:50
2  
I guess you could have ZooAnimal descendant of Animal and inherit only Tiger and Hippo from it and then have List<ZooAnimal>? –  Veli Oct 5 '12 at 12:50
    
What's wrong with List<Type>? –  aleksey.berezan Oct 5 '12 at 12:52
    
In the List<Type> any Type is allowed. I want to limit that –  Odys Oct 5 '12 at 12:53
    
@Veli I do not want object instances, but object Types in the list –  Odys Oct 5 '12 at 12:54
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6 Answers

If you want a list of only certain types:

There isn't anything in generics that can support what you are asking for, so simply create a custom type that allows you to store Type types and have code at runtime for guarding against invalid entries:

public class CagedTypes 
{
    private readonly List<Type> _types;

    public void Add(Type t)
    {
        if (t == typeof(Hippo) || t == typeof(Tiger))
            _types.Add(t);
    }
}

Although I can't see why you might need this.

Alternative if you want a list of only certain types:

Do the same as above, but include the interface below and change the add check to something like:

public void Add(Type t)
{
    if (t.GetInterfaces().Contains(typeof(ICanBeHeldInZooCage)))
        _types.Add(t);
}

You could also use attributes, as you can query a type for any attributes using the GetAttributes method.

If you wish to only have certain instances in a list:

Create a marker interface:

public interface ICanBeHeldInZooCage

That Tiger and Hippo implement (doesn't have to do anything), then you can have:

var cagedAnimals = new List<ICanBeHeldInZooCage>();
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Exactly that multiple if part is what I want to avoid. I've edited the question to include the fact that I want to register allowed types in runtime –  Odys Oct 5 '12 at 13:06
    
@odyodyodys I've amended my answer with another option. It uses the convention that an interface exists on the allowed types. –  Adam Houldsworth Oct 5 '12 at 13:17
    
+1 for all the additional options, personally I prefer to store the types in an interface and use that interface to hold the types in a list. –  JonH Oct 5 '12 at 13:45
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How about an Interface?

public interface ICageable {}

public abstract class Animal {}

public class Hippo : Animal, ICageable {}

public class Tiger : Animal, ICageable {}

public class Human : Animal, ICageable {}

public class Ape : Animal {}

....
List<ICageable> ZooAnimals = new List<ICageable>{hippo, tiger, human};

(writing from a Planet of the Apes perspective)

and if you need the types themselves in a list, well types are instances of the Type type, so whatever you create it will be a collection of types. You could encapsulate is like this:

public class CageableTypesCollection : 
{
    private List<Type> _cageableTypes;

    public CageableTypesCollection()
    {
       _cageableTypes = new List<Type>();
    }

    public RegisterType(Type t)
    {
       if (!typeof(ICageable).IsAssignableFrom(t))
          throw new ArgumentException("wrong type of type");
       _cageableTypes.Add(t);
    }

    public UnregisterType(Type t)
    {
       ....
    }

    .....

}
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1  
damn dirty apes... –  chris Oct 5 '12 at 13:02
    
I want to hold object Types and not object instances. This is clear in both the question title and body. I don't understand why this is answer has upvotes at all. –  Odys Oct 5 '12 at 13:05
    
@odyodyodys: added the types thing, sorry, misread the question first, but left it as a preamble. –  SWeko Oct 5 '12 at 13:11
    
Thanks, that seems promising. –  Odys Oct 5 '12 at 13:14
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Approach1 - via interfaces:

public interface ICageable
{ }

public abstract class Animal
{}

public class Hippo : Animal, ICageable
{}

public class Human : Animal, ICageable
{}

public IEnumerable<Type> GetCageableAnimals()
{
    return  GetAssemblyTypes(assembly:typeof(Animal).Assembly)
        .Where(type=>IsDerivedFrom(type, typeof(Animal)))
        .Where(type=>ImplementsInterface(type,typeof(ICageable)));
}

Approach 2 - via attribute:

public class InCageAttribute : Attribute
{ }

public abstract class Animal
{}

[InCage]
public class Hippo : Animal
{}

public class Human : Animal
{}

public IEnumerable<Type> GetCageableAnimals()
{
    return  GetAssemblyTypes(assembly:typeof(Animal).Assembly)
        .Where(type=>IsDerivedFrom(type, typeof(Animal)))
        .Where(type=>MarkedByAttribute(type,typeof(InCageAttribute)));
}

UPDATE

IMPORTANT

Both these approaches provide only runtime check. having compilation check implementation would be better, but don't know for know how to achieve that.

UPDATE2
For dynamic registration:

public class CageRegistry
{
    private List<Type> _allowedTypes = new List<Type>();
    public IEnumerable<Type> AllowedTypes{get{return _allowedTypes;}}

    public bool TryAdd(Type type)
    {
        if(ImplementsInterface(type, typeof(ICageable)))// for approach with attributes code is pretty similar
        {
            _allowedTypes.Add(type);
            return true;
        }
        return false;
    }
}

PS2
Sorry for not implemented methods like MarkedByAttribute, IsDerivedFrom and ImplementsInterface - I just don't have visual studio on current machine yet and don't remember api exactly.

share|improve this answer
    
I've edited my question to include that I want to dynamically register allowed types and not at compile type. Although I found your answers intereting –  Odys Oct 5 '12 at 13:12
    
Yeah, I've read your update, that's why I've written that code - thought it's dynamic enough :) you can invoke it dynamically, whatever it means :) Speaking seriously, what do you mean by "dynamic registration of allowed types" ? –  aleksey.berezan Oct 5 '12 at 13:22
    
+1, I like the attribute approach. –  SWeko Oct 5 '12 at 13:38
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I would use an interface to determine if an animal is a ZooAnimal

  public class Animal
  {
    public string Name;
  }
  public class Tiger : Animal, IZooAnimal
  {

  }
  public class Human : Animal
  {

  }
  public interface IZooAnimal
  {
    //Some zoo animal properties
  }

And then check if the animal is a Zoo Animal if (a is IZooAnimal) below is a zoo class which you could use.

  public class Zoo
  {
    public List<IZooAnimal> AnimalsInZoo = new List<IZooAnimal>();
    public void AddAnimal(IZooAnimal a)
    {
      AnimalsInZoo.Add(a);
    }
  }

EDIT:

Ok now to do this with types and constrain the types to a ZooAnimal I have made a generic zoo class which takes T where T is a ZooAnimal - you could have a list of ZooAnimals or a list of tigers in our case.

  public class Zoo<T> where T : IZooAnimal
  {
    public List<Type> AnimalTypes = new List<Type>();
    public void AddType(Type a)
    {
      if (typeof(T) == a)
        AnimalTypes.Add(a);
    }
  }

This will add type Tiger to the AnimalsInZoo. Hope this works for you.

  Zoo<IZooAnimal> cage = new Zoo<IZooAnimal>();
  cage.AddType(typeof(Tiger));
  cage.AddType(typeof(Human));
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@AgentFire Thanks - too quick for my own good, why I wanted to pass an animal and cast it instead of only accepting an IZooAnimal in the constructor i'll never know! –  LukeHennerley Oct 5 '12 at 13:04
    
@LukeHannerley I want to hold object types and not object instances –  Odys Oct 5 '12 at 13:06
    
@odyodyodys So in a List you want to hold a List<Type>, you never want to hold instances? –  LukeHennerley Oct 5 '12 at 13:14
    
@LukeHennerly Exactly –  Odys Oct 5 '12 at 13:16
    
@odyodyodys There you go should work now :) –  LukeHennerley Oct 5 '12 at 13:31
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Human is animal, Tiger is animal that should be in zoo. So in your case I'd create one more base class for Tiger and Hippo.

public class AnimalInZoo : Animal {}
public class Tiger : AnimalInZoo {}
public class Hippo : AnimalInZoo {}
public class Human : Animal {}

You can create helper function AddInZoo(AnimalInZoo obj) to add in you List<Type> m_Zoo:

void AddInZoo(AnimalInZoo obj)
{
    m_Zoo.Add(obj.GetType());
}
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The OP wants a list of types, not instances. I just fell into that trap... –  Adam Houldsworth Oct 5 '12 at 12:57
    
Edited question to make it more clear. Sorry about that –  Odys Oct 5 '12 at 12:58
    
@odyodyodys I've edited answer too. –  Leri Oct 5 '12 at 13:02
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The other option:

public abstract class Animal
{
    public abstract bool IsCagable { get; }
}

And let the nested classes to implement their behavior.

Later then, the some sort of Zoo class which is mostly presented in the answers in this topic, inside the method Add must do the check:

public sealed class ZooList : List<Animal> // I believe you need Animal, not Type
{
    // ... some implementations ...

    public override sealed void Add(Animal animal)
    {
        if (!animal.IsCagable)
            // Prevent from adding.
    }
}
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As IsCageable is an instance variable, this could mean that some instances of a certain type (let's say humans) are cageable, and some not, so it would be moved from the type level (where the OP requires it) to the instance level. –  SWeko Oct 5 '12 at 13:37
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