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I have a problem with Spring: I need to reuse the same instance of bean twice, but not making it singleton.

Here is a brief ApplicationContext:

<bean class="a.b.c.Provider" id="defaultProvider" scope="prototype">
    <constructor-arg ref="lifecycle" />
    <constructor-arg ref="propertySetter" />
</bean>

<bean name="lifecycle" class="a.b.c.Lifecycle" scope="prototype">
        <constructor-arg ref="someParam" />
        ... and more args
</bean>

<bean id="propertySetter" class="a.b.c.PropertySetter" scope="prototype">
    <constructor-arg ref="lifecycle" />
</bean>

So, I need to have fully initialized Provider with Lifecycle and PropertySetter inside, and this PropertySetter must contain reference to same Lifecycle, as the Provider have.

When I define lifecycle and propertySetter as singletons, it causes big problems, because if I create more than one Provider, all instances of Provider class shares same lifecycle and property setter, and it's breaking application logic.

When I try to define all beans as prototypes, Lifecycles in Provider and in PropertySetter are not the same => exceptions again.

I have one solution: to pass to Provider only Lifecycle and create PropertySetter inside Provider java constructor (by extending Provider). It is working well, but only in my local environment. In production code I can't extend 3pty Provider class, so I can't use this solution.

Please advise me, what most appropriate to do in this situation?

share|improve this question
    
Why do you need to do this? –  Dave Newton Oct 5 '12 at 13:02
    
@DaveNewton I need to do it because of requirements. This is a small bad-designed plugin of complex application, and I can't redesign it deep. –  WinnieRazor Oct 5 '12 at 13:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You don't need to extend Provider. Just create your own ProviderFactory that will take reference to lifecycle and will create PropertySetter and then Provider:

public class ProviderFactory {

  public static create(Lifecycle lc) {
    return new Provider(lc, new PropertySetter(lc));
  }
}

Here is Spring declaration:

<bean id="defaultProvider" scope="prototype" 
      class="a.b.c.ProviderFactory" factory-method="create">
    <constructor-arg ref="lifecycle" />
</bean>
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I've implemented my fix this way. Greetings from Russia :) –  WinnieRazor Oct 9 '12 at 8:44

Could you try resolving your problem with the spring expression language :

<bean class="a.b.c.Provider" id="defaultProvider" scope="prototype">
    <constructor-arg value="#{#this.propertySetter.lifecycle}" />
    <constructor-arg ref="propertySetter" />
</bean>

<bean name="lifecycle" class="a.b.c.Lifecycle" scope="prototype">
        <constructor-arg ref="someParam" />
        ... and more args
</bean>

<bean id="propertySetter" class="a.b.c.PropertySetter" scope="prototype">
    <constructor-arg ref="lifecycle" />
</bean>
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, very interesting proposal, but I can't get PropertySetter of Provider anyway. And will the "#this" operator work for object, that is being created at the moment? –  WinnieRazor Oct 9 '12 at 8:40
    
If your provider does not define a getter for PropertySetter, and your PropertySetter does not define a getter for Lifecycle, then this will not work. And, yes the "#this" operator works for the object that is being created at the moment ;) –  Oussama Zoghlami Oct 9 '12 at 11:38

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