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I have a file containing 100000 lines like this

1 0110100010010101
2 1000010010111001
3 1000011001111000
10 1011110000111110
123 0001000000100001

I would like to know how can I display efficiently just the second field by adding whitespaces between characters.

0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 1
1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 1
1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0
1 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 0
0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1

One solution would be to get the second column with awk and then add the whitespaces using sed. But as the file is too long I would like to avoid using pipes. Then I'm wondering if I can do that by just using awk.

Thanks in advance

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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

is this ok?

awk '{gsub(/./,"& ",$2);print $2}' yourFile

example

kent$  echo "1 0110100010010101
2 1000010010111001
3 1000011001111000"|awk '{gsub(/./,"& ",$2);print $2}'
0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 
1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 
1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0

update

more than 2 digits in 1st column won't work? I didn't get it:

kent$  echo "133 0110100010010101
233 1000010010111001
333 1000011001111000"|awk '{gsub(/./,"& ",$2);print $2}'
0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 
1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 
1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 


gsub(/./,"& ", $2)

1 /./  match any single character
2 "& " & here means the matched string, in this case, each character
3 $2   column 2

so it means, replace each character in 2nd column into the character itself + " ".
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Thank you for your answer. But I forgot to mention that the first column contains values with more than two digits. Then I think that it would not work. –  saloua Oct 5 '12 at 13:15
    
@tuxworker 2 digits should work too, see update. –  Kent Oct 5 '12 at 13:17
    
could you please explain the meaning of used regular expressions in gsub(/./,"& ",$2) –  saloua Oct 5 '12 at 13:22
    
@tuxworker added –  Kent Oct 5 '12 at 13:26

One way using only awk:

awk '{ gsub( /./, "& ", $2 ); print $2; }' infile

That yields:

0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 
1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 
1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0

EDIT: Kent and I gave the same implementation, so, for this answer to be a bit more useful, I will add the sed one:

sed -e 's/^[^ ]* *//; s/./& /g' infile
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sed solution.

sed 's/.* //;s/\(.\)/\1 /g'

It adds an extra space at the end of each line. Add ;s/ $// to the expression to remove it.

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Just adding a sed alternative:

sed -e 's/^.* *//;s/./& /g;s/ $//' file

Three comands:

  1. Remove the characters and spaces on the start of the line
  2. Replace everycharacter with itself followed by a space
  3. (Optional) Remove the trailing space at the end of the line
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This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed 's/^\S*\s*//;s/\B/ /g' /file
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