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How can I execute an actionListener before a ajax request?

<h:commandButton actionListener=.. action=..>
<f:ajax render="test">
</h:commandButton>

order of execution is:

test
actionListener
action

What can I change so that actionListener method is executed before f:ajax?


Full example:

<h:form>
    <h:commandButton value="test" actionListener="#{bean.toggleProgress}" action="#{bean.do()}" > 
        <f:ajax execute="@form" render="progress" />
    </h:commandButton>

    <h:panelGroup id="progress" >
        <h:outputText rendered="#{bean.progress}" />
    </h:panelGroup> 
</h:form>

class Bean {

    private progress = false;

    public boolean isProgress() {
        System.out.println("in: ajax")
        return progress;
    }

    public toggleProgress(ActionEvent e) {
        System.out.println("in: actionListener")
        progress = true;
    }

    public void do() {
        System.out.println("in: action")
    }
}

systout is:

in: ajax
in: actionListener
in: action
share|improve this question
    
What you're describing is not true. It must be a misinterpretation. I think the latter as you don't have anywhere a <f:ajax listener>. Perhaps you're confusing JavaScript onclick or so with Java? –  BalusC Oct 5 '12 at 13:13
    
Indeed it is! edited above with full example. –  membersound Oct 5 '12 at 13:23
    
Is the sysout from during a form submit? Are you sure that the 1st line isn't from the initial GET request? –  BalusC Oct 5 '12 at 13:30
    
yes the initial GET request produces a "in: ajax" additionally. But the sysout above is just from the submit! –  membersound Oct 5 '12 at 13:30
    
Well, I've never seen that. What JSF impl/version are you using? Your full example by the way doesn't compile, but that'll be the carelessness :/ –  BalusC Oct 5 '12 at 13:33

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