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If read a file with default column names, how do call them after? df[1] seems to work almost all of the time. However, it complains about types when writing conditions like:

In [60]: cond = ((df[1] != node) & (df[2] != deco))
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
TypeError                                 Traceback (most recent call last)
/home/ferreirafm/work/colab/SNP/rawdata/<ipython-input-60-513a433bfeb5> in <module>()
----> 1 cond = ((df[1] != node) & (df[2] != deco))

/usr/lib64/python2.7/site-packages/pandas/core/series.pyc in wrapper(self, other)
140             if np.isscalar(res):
141                 raise TypeError('Could not compare %s type with Series'
--> 142                                 % type(other))
143             return Series(na_op(values, other),
144                           index=self.index, name=self.name)

TypeError: Could not compare <type 'str'> type with Series

Treat dataframe columns by default names are more appropriate for my applications.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It seems that you compare a series of scalar values to a string:

In [73]: node = 'a'

In [74]: deco = 'b'

In [75]: data = [(10, 'a', 1), (11, 'b', 2), (12, 'c', 3)]

In [76]: df = pd.DataFrame(data)

In [77]: df
Out[77]: 
    0  1  2
0  10  a  1
1  11  b  2
2  12  c  3

In [78]: cond = ((df[1] != node) & (df[2] != deco))
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
TypeError                                 Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-78-0afad3702859> in <module>()
----> 1 cond = ((df[1] != node) & (df[2] != deco))

/home/.../python2.7/site-packages/pandas/core/series.pyc in wrapper(self, other)
    140             if np.isscalar(res):
    141                 raise TypeError('Could not compare %s type with Series'
--> 142                                 % type(other))
    143             return Series(na_op(values, other),
    144                           index=self.index, name=self.name)

TypeError: Could not compare <type 'str'> type with Series

Note that pandas can handle strings and numbers in a series, but it not really makes sense to compare strings and numbers, so the error message is useful. However pandas should perhaps give a more detailed error message.

If your condition for the column 2 would be a number it would work:

In [79]: deco = 3

In [80]: cond = ((df[1] != node) & (df[2] != deco))

In [81]: df[cond]
Out[81]: 
    0  1  2
1  11  b  2

Some comments:

Maybe some of your confusion is due to a design decision in pandas:

If you read data from a file with read_csv the default column names of the resulting data frame are set to X.1 to X.N (and to X1 to XN for versions >= 0.9), which are strings.

If you create a data frame from exiting arrays or lists or something the column names default to 0 to N and are integers.

In [23]: df = pd.read_csv(StringIO(data), header=None)

In [24]: df.columns
Out[24]: Index([X.1, X.2, X.3], dtype=object)

In [25]: df.columns[0]
Out[25]: 'X.1'

In [26]: type(df.columns[0])
Out[26]: str

In [27]: df = pd.DataFrame(randn(2,3))

In [30]: df.columns
Out[30]: Int64Index([0, 1, 2])

In [31]: df.columns[0]
Out[31]: 0

In [32]: type(df.columns[0])
Out[32]: numpy.int64

I opened a ticket to discuss this.

So your

In [60]: cond = ((df[1] != node) & (df[2] != deco))

should work for a dataframe created from an array or something, if the type of df[1] and df[2] is the same as the type of node and deco.

If you have read a file with read_csv than

In [60]: cond = ((df['X.2'] != node) & (df['X.3'] != deco))

should work with versions < 0.9, while it should be

In [60]: cond = ((df['X2'] != node) & (df['X3'] != deco))

with versions >= 0.9.

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1  
Thanks for clarifying. I think the big mistake here is the version which I'm using. For Pandas 0.8.1 df[1] works when using DataFrame construtor, but not when reading from files. When reading df from files is mandatory to set names (colnames) for read_csv (df['Name'] - no problems with str comparisons), on the other hand neither df[1] nor df['x.1'] will work. I'm not criticizing, Pandas is great! Wouldn't be more pythonic to use the same default columns name whatever the way you build your DataFrame? Best. –  fred Oct 8 '12 at 12:31
    
to use the same default column names is what I suggested in the ticket. –  bmu Oct 8 '12 at 18:46
    
however I think your original problem should be due to a comparison of a string with a series of numbers. Can you please edit your example and show the values of node and deco. –  bmu Oct 8 '12 at 18:50
    
as I said, I couldn't be able to make things work using all of the default column names suggested. The solution was to set columns names when reading csv. Have a look here. –  fred Oct 8 '12 at 20:06
    
the code there is different from the code you posted here. But from the error message it is clear that it was a problem of compariosn with a string. Maybe you can update your question. –  bmu Oct 10 '12 at 8:17

I`m on pandas master, here default column names after reading a file are certainly not 0, 1, 2, .. Note that you can use df.icol() to select a column by position. This way there is no dependency if column names have been set, or default column names are used.

In [93]: data = """\
1,2,3
4,5,6
"""

In [94]: df = pd.read_csv(StringIO(data), header=None)

In [95]: df
Out[95]:
   X0  X1  X2
0   1   2   3
1   4   5   6

In [96]: df.icol(0)
Out[96]:
0    1
1    4
Name: X0
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I didn't know. Because, it works for df = DataFrame(randn(2,3)) df[0]. Wierd! –  fred Oct 5 '12 at 14:52
    
... also, after reading a file, I've got Name: X.1 when df.icol(0). Bleeding edge? –  fred Oct 5 '12 at 14:58
    
The change from X.1 to X1 is recent (github.com/pydata/pandas/issues/2000). Default column names when reading from file are different then default column names when using one of the DataFrame constructors. –  Wouter Overmeire Oct 5 '12 at 15:01
    
Could we use, in future versions, df[X1] then? –  fred Oct 5 '12 at 15:41
    
@fred the column names are strings in this case, so it should be df['X1'] or df['X.1'] for versions < 0.9. –  bmu Oct 7 '12 at 13:45

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