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If you check absent elements with the following code:

// ...
driver.manage().timeouts().implicitlyWait(30, TimeUnit.SECONDS);
try {
    driver.findElement(By.cssSelector("td.name"));
} catch (NoSuchElementException e) {

    // here you go, element not found

}

You get right result, but running time is always 30 seconds, due to findElement method blocking on the implicit wait.

Is there a way to avoid this behavior, while keeping the implicit wait in place?

<EDIT> tests are going to be generated through Selenium IDE by non-developers, so I need a solution that keeps their job as simple as possible (that's keeping waits implicit!). </EDIT>

Thanks,

Marco

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Can you not make a central method, that sets the implicit wait to something small, then resets it back to 30 seconds? –  Arran Oct 5 '12 at 23:29
    
I would be tempted to drop the implicits entirely, though I'm using a template to convert test cases written with Selenium IDE and I was hoping to keep changes to the code to the minimum. –  Marco Bolis Oct 6 '12 at 19:19

5 Answers 5

You might be able to do it with xpath selectors. Find the element just before it that you know should be there, then use "following-sibling" to get the next element. Something like:

//td.previous/following-sibling::td

Then check to see that it hasn't returned the "name" one. Of course that would only work if there is another "td" element.

Personally I'd be tempted to drop the implicit waits and just use waits when they are required.

private WebElement cssWait( final String css )
{
    return new WebDriverWait( driver, 30 ).until( new ExpectedCondition< WebElement >()
    {
        @Override
        public WebElement apply( WebDriver d )
        {
            return d.findElement( By.cssSelector( css ) );
        }
    } );
}
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+1 for the clever solution. Unfortunately... see edit –  Marco Bolis Oct 8 '12 at 7:24

Instead of setting up timeouts I use fluentWait which were introduced in 2.25.

public void waitForElement(WebDriver driver, final String xpath)
{
 //Set up fluentWait to wait for 35 seconds polling every 1
 Wait<WebDriver> fluentWait = new FluentWait<WebDriver>(driver)
     .withTimeout(35, TimeUnit.SECONDS)
     .pollingEvery(1, TimeUnit.SECONDS)
     .ignoring(NoSuchElementException.class);

 WebElement element;

 //Look for element, if not found start fluentWait
 try
 {
     element = driver.findElement(By.xpath(xpath));
 }
 catch (WebDriverException e)
 {
     logger.info("[getElementByXpath] Element not initially found. Starting fluentWait ["+xpath+"]");

     try
     {
         element = fluentWait.until(new Function<WebDriver, WebElement>() {
             public WebElement apply(WebDriver d) {

                 return d.findElement(By.xpath(xpath));
             }
         });
     }
     catch (WebDriverException f)
     {
         logger.info("[getElementByXpath] FluentWait findElement threw exception:\n\n" + f +"\n\n");

         throw new WebDriverException("Unable to find element ["+xpath+"]");
     }
 }

 //Once we've found the element wait for element to become visible
 fluentWait.until(ExpectedConditions.visibilityOf(element));
}

If you were to convert your methods to something like this, you would be able to remove your driver.manage().timeouts().implicitlyWait(30, TimeUnit.SECONDS); allowing you to 'Not' find an element instantly.

Hope this helps!

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That's the way I would normally go, thank you. Alas... see edit. –  Marco Bolis Oct 8 '12 at 7:25

The methods above wait for the provided amount of time even if the element is not present anymore. I wrote my own methods for waiting until element is visible and not present. They work for me. Here they are:

public void waitUntilElementExists(By by, int waitSeconds,
        int noOfRetries) {
    getDriver().manage().timeouts().implicitlyWait(waitSeconds, TimeUnit.SECONDS);
    boolean foundElement = false;
    for (int i = 0; i < noOfRetries; i++)
        try {
            getDriver().findElement(by);
            foundElement = true;
            break;
        } catch (Exception e) {
        }
    assertTrue("The searched element was not found after " + noOfRetries * waitSeconds + " seconds!", foundElement);
}

public void waitUntilElementDoesntExist(By by, int waitSeconds,
        int noOfRetries) {
    getDriver().manage().timeouts().implicitlyWait(waitSeconds, TimeUnit.SECONDS);
    boolean elementDisappeared = false;
    for (int i = 0; i < noOfRetries; i++)
        try {
            getDriver().findElement(by);
            waitABit(1000 * waitSeconds);
        } catch (Exception e) {
            elementDisappeared = true;
            break;
        }
    assertTrue("The searched element did not disappear after " + noOfRetries * waitSeconds + " seconds!", elementDisappeared);
}
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You need a function like this, that uses findElements, not findElement:

public static ExpectedCondition<Boolean> elementCountIs(final By sel, final int count) {
    return new ExpectedCondition<Boolean>() {
        public Boolean apply(WebDriver driver) {
            return driver.findElements(sel).size() == count;
        }
    };
}

Then you can set up a FluentWait object as described by Falkenfighter and:

fluentWait.until(elementCountIs(By.cssSelector("td.name"), 0);
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Sorry, I've now realised this is incorrect. Implicit waits apply just as much to findElements as findElement, which is highly annoying. –  Tim Band May 1 at 15:28

You'll have to update the ImplicitWait temporarily, and reset it after you're done.

This is the way we've handled this situation - save the current default, update the ImplicitWait temporarily, then change back to the default afterwards.
This is based off Mozilla's suggestion, which is how they handle this situation where you are expecting something to not be present: https://blog.mozilla.org/webqa/2012/07/12/webdrivers-implicit-wait-and-deleting-elements/

public bool ElementExists(By by, int waitMilliseconds)
{
        var defaultWebDriverTimeout = 30000;// Get default timeout that you're using
        WebDriver.Manage().Timeouts().ImplicitlyWait(TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(waitMilliseconds));

        try
        {
            WebDriver.FindElement(by); //Note could be FindElements instead, but this is quicker
            return true;
        }
        catch (NoSuchElementException)
        {
            return false;
        }
        finally
        {
            WebDriver.Manage().Timeouts().ImplicitlyWait(TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(defaultWebDriverTimeout));
        }
}
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