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The java code:

public static <T extends Throwable> void checkNotNull(Object value, String name, Class<T> exceptionClass) throws T, SecurityException, IllegalArgumentException, NoSuchMethodException, InstantiationException, IllegalAccessException, InvocationTargetException {
    if (value==null)
      throw ExceptionHelper.constructException(exceptionClass, name + " should not be null");
}

static <T extends Throwable> T constructException(java.lang.Class<T> exceptionClass, String message) throws SecurityException, NoSuchMethodException, IllegalArgumentException, InstantiationException, IllegalAccessException, InvocationTargetException {
    Constructor<T> constructor = exceptionClass.getConstructor(String.class);
    T result = constructor.newInstance(message);
    return result;
}

The junit code:

@Test
public void testCheckNotNull() {
    try {
    ValidationUtility.checkNotNull(null, "valuename", exceptionClass);
    } catch (T e) {
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    e.printStackTrace();
      } 
}

Then the compiler says: Cannot use the type parameter T in a catch block

So how to solve this issue?

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2  
Replace T by Throwable since your type parameter may not be declared within your junit code. –  Mik378 Oct 5 '12 at 14:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

By

Constructor<T> constructor = exceptionClass.getConstructor(String.class);
T result = constructor.newInstance(message);

You are creating result object of class passed as argument. Here by using 'T', only it means that you are constructing the result with the class which extends Throwable.

In the test method, even if do like this declare it:

    @Test
    public <T extends Throwable> void testCheckNotNull() {
        try {
        ValidationUtility.checkNotNull(null, "valuename", exceptionClass);
        } catch (T e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
          } 
    }

Still T is a type, not a class e.g. Exception which can be caught. As you have found in the error, you will not be able to catch a Type.

Since you know, Type T is representing classes extending Throwable, use may want to use Throwable in the catch block.

        } catch (Throwable e) {
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I have another problem. How to create a exceptionClass in test case when invoking ValidationUtility.checkNotNull(null, "valuename", exceptionClass), since the exceptionClass type is Class<T>. Is just "Class<T> exceptionClass;" OK? –  user1703055 Oct 5 '12 at 15:25
    
Jut by declaring Class<T> exceptionClass, exceptionClass can't be passed as argument to checkNotNull method as it is not initialized. If you are doing something else to initialize it, please share how is it initialized? –  Yogendra Singh Oct 5 '12 at 15:39
    
I just don't know how to initialize it, for its type is java.lang.Class<T>. –  user1703055 Oct 5 '12 at 16:00
    
This is what I guessed earlier. Your exception class has to be some class which is extended from Thwowable e.g. java.lang.NullPointerException. In that case, you can call your checkNotNull as ValidationUtility.checkNotNull(null, "valuename", java.lang.NullPointerException.class);. –  Yogendra Singh Oct 5 '12 at 16:25
    
Thank you a lot for your help. I have known how to do. –  user1703055 Oct 5 '12 at 16:44

Since T is not known at compile time, you can't use it in a catch block like that. It is simply not something that is supported by the compiler, hence the error.

If your intent is to verify that the correct exception is thrown, I would suggest modifying your Test code like this:

@Test
public void testCheckNotNull() {
    try {
        ValidationUtility.checkNotNull(null, "valuename", exceptionClass);
    } catch (Throwable e) {
        assertEquals(exceptionClass, e.getClass());
    } 
}
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As specified in earlier answer you cannot catch T. This is because of erasure. I would suggest using the JUnit4 expected if you are expecting an exception.

@Test(expected = Throwable.class)
public void testCheckNotNull() throws Throwable {
     ValidationUtility.checkNotNull(null, "valuename", exceptionClass);
}

There is a bug with your test code too. If no exception is thrown then the test will still pass. You need to have a fail in there too

@Test
public void testCheckNotNull() {
    try {
      ValidationUtility.checkNotNull(null, "valuename", exceptionClass);
      fail("expected to throw")
    } catch (Throwable e) {}
}
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